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Some say the watch we wear is about getting noticed, or making a statement. This is not why I wear watches.

When I was a young lad (about 8 years old), I found an old mantle clock in my grandma's shed. It did not work and she said I could tinker with it. I disassembled the clock and found it was made in Philadelphia, USA. I grew up in England, and the clock fascinated me. I worked on the clock for days on end, and eventually this 8 year old got the clock running. It chimed perfectly and kept good time. Ever since, I have been passionate about all things mechanical. And this is why I only wear mechanical or automatic watches. I found out years later, the clock was initially sold through the Sears and Roebuck catalog around the turn of the century (1912 or so), Today, that same clock is sitting on a sideboard in my Stepdads house, still running. Mum passsed a few years ago, one day I'll get the clock back. Till then, my watches will do.

Just wanted to share this story with other watch folks, Do you have a story?
 

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DingBat wrote:

Some say the watch we wear is about getting noticed, or making a statement. This is not why I wear watches.

When I was a young lad (about 8 years old), I found an old mantle clock in my grandma's shed. It did not work and she said I could tinker with it. I disassembled the clock and found it was made in Philadelphia, USA. I grew up in England, and the clock fascinated me. I worked on the clock for days on end, and eventually this 8 year old got the clock running. It chimed perfectly and kept good time. Ever since, I have been passionate about all things mechanical. And this is why I only wear mechanical or automatic watches. I found out years later, the clock was initially sold through the Sears and Roebuck catalog aroung the turn of the century (1912 or so), Today, that same clock is sitting on a sideboard in my Stepdads house, still running. Mum passsed a few years ago, one day I'll get the clock back. Till then, my watches will do.

Just wanted to share this story with other watch folks, Do you have a story?
Very cool story. I like automatic/mechanical watches for the same reasons as you. They intrigue me. I own a limited amount of quartz watches because they just aren't that fascinating. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Great story! Everything I take apart has parts left over, IF I manage to find the time to try and put it back together!

Maybe that's why I appreciate mechanicals so much!

I have one quartz that I like to wear, but all the rest are autos or my one hand-winder.

I wish my story was as good as yours!

David
 

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Great story! I've only got mechanical (auto) in my collection and have always said quartz watches tell the time, a mechanical watch tells a story!!:)
 

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Hi DingBat, what a great story! For several years my wife Theresa worked in a clock repair shop. The business is no longer but the owner has become a friend to us and we still visit. He did teach me a little about old clocks and repairsour old clocks when needed. I always liked antiques and learned to enjoy antique timepieces and clocks.What a story that the clock you repaired is still working and being enjoyed today. I agree about mechanical timepieces. What a marvel of engineering mechanical clocks and watches are. Thank you for sharring your story. Oh by the way, welcome to WatchFreeks, very glad you found us. ....Bob
 

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You know being a mechanical engineer, you would think I would get a charge out of a mechanical watch but I dont. Is it a cool concept sure, but like I have stated before, technology is a masterful thing. I am just glad we dont build buildings, bridges,Cars, Planes the way we use too. Mech/Auto's are cool but they as a whole dont do much for me.

Nice story and if Mech/Auto's float you boat and they make you happy Good deal, Good story as well.
 

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That is a really cool story. I hope you get the clock back sooner then later and in the same condition that you remember.
 

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DingBat wrote:
...Just wanted to share this story with other watch folks, Do you have a story?

This is a great little story, thanks.

I appreciate the mechanical clock movements as well, not that I ever fixed one, but I am aghast at the level of mechanical perfection and miniaturization it took to create a pocket watch 200~300 years ago or the invention of the mechanical clock in the 13th Century. Today, the 20th Century technologies of wristwatch manufacturing are not as much of an accomplishment as it was in the early 1900.

But since the original idea of a mechanical clock movement is so old, the technology is so ancient, to me, it's like wearing some kind of Nobel talisman paying honor and tribute to the mechanical prowess and intellect of mankind's gifted ancestors!

YEA!
 

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Thanks for sharing your story! I enjoyed reading it!


I am amazed and amused with my mechanical/automatics timepieces. They see 50:1 wrist time over (what few) quartz watches I own.

As a kid, I was known for taking things apart to see what makes them "tick". Watches were no different. I am fascinated with mechanical systems and how to improve them.

When I was at an age (late 1970s, early 1980s) to considering buying a new timepiece, the Japanese quartz craze was in full bloom! Unless you were willing to settle for an Asian produced "dollar watch", or had the funds for a Swiss Made timepiece, Japanese quartz (digital) was what you got! Since I was in my later teens during this time, most Swiss watches were not even a consideration.

When the mechanical/automatic "craze" of the 1990s bloomed, I could once again find watches of my liking. Once again, focus was placed on traditional watchmaking. Once again, I returned to disassembling, repairing and reassembling mechanical movements for fun and eventually for a side income.

Now that I can afford to buy 80% of the watches that catch my eye, there will most likely be a mechanical/automatic movement in all >$200 watches that I buy.

I enjoy the ongoing challenge of snagging mechanical watches that are accurate. Accurate mechanical watches are a joy to own (not an expectation like quartz). I truly feel that the precision of quartz has taken an entire generation away from some of the joys in owning a watch. There's nothing like regulating (or have your watchmaker regulate for you) your mechanical automatics to run within COSC specs.



DingBat wrote:
Some say the watch we wear is about getting noticed, or making a statement. This is not why I wear watches.

When I was a young lad (about 8 years old), I found an old mantle clock in my grandma's shed. It did not work and she said I could tinker with it. I disassembled the clock and found it was made in Philadelphia, USA. I grew up in England, and the clock fascinated me. I worked on the clock for days on end, and eventually this 8 year old got the clock running. It chimed perfectly and kept good time. Ever since, I have been passionate about all things mechanical. And this is why I only wear mechanical or automatic watches. I found out years later, the clock was initially sold through the Sears and Roebuck catalog around the turn of the century (1912 or so), Today, that same clock is sitting on a sideboard in my Stepdads house, still running. Mum passsed a few years ago, one day I'll get the clock back. Till then, my watches will do.

Just wanted to share this story with other watch folks, Do you have a story?
 
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