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Discussion Starter #1
I've read many comments that indicate that many don't give much consideration (or any at all) to resale value when evaluating new purchases.

We're often sure the next carefully considered purchase will be a perfect watch that will be kept in perpetuity, and so future value is irrelevant.

My 2.5 cents is you always should evaluate resale, or retained value, because you really cannot project where you'll be and what your preferences will be 10-15 years down the road.

Think about it this way, how accurately would the person you were in 2002 describe the daily life style, habits and preferences of the you today; down to and including the specifics of the watches you would be considering for your collection?

What you love now, may not hold such a spot in your heart in the future or may no longer be practical for you as time passes.

Case in point, years ago I had absolutely zero interest in large dials. Now with eyesight fading, I purchased a Concord C2 with a 45mm case last summer. Up until that point, I'd never owned anything larger than a 38mm.

My C2 is complete with a rubber strap even - another option I would have absolutely never considered 15 years ago.

But now my eye sight is weaker and we boat regularly during the summer and the strap makes sense for that purpose..... so there you go.

Watches I thought I would keep forever I can no longer read the complications and may part with.

There are too many future unknowns to ignore resale value.

Unless your independently wealthy and really just don't care, in which case you can just ignore the above as it very well may not apply to you.
 

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Good points to ponder, but not for me. I'm not independently wealthy, & I'm one guy that doesn't care about resale value. I always buy new & never sell, so I'm able to bypass this concern. To each their own way.
 

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I see my slowly growing collection of modest watches as a hobby (just like the slowly growing collection of vintage Voigtländer range finder cameras) and not as any form of investment or savings for a rainy day. Out of all my watches acquired during my lifetime (approximately 60) I only sold two. One to my brother (at great loss :D), a Cartier Santos Dumont Carré and the watch I purchased with part of that money, a Cartier Tank Vermeil (Quartz, boo, hiss). Both in the early Eighties. I sold the latter because it was a huge mistake on my part. After that I gave my watches away, threw them away because they became defective or kept them.
 

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GoodWatch started a similar thread.

link --> http://www.watchfreeks.com/33-general-watch-discussions/219817-i-don-t-care-about-resale-value.html

My rule in all purchases in life. "Don't over pay." For depreciable assets such as watches, this usually means buy used. If the watch was worth anything to begin with, it should still be in good shape.
Wow! I totally forgot about that! Over 50 became approx. 60 watches which is about correct. It must be either my age or alcohol consumption that made me forget :D
 

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Even if you don't plan on reselling the item, consider cost per year. Right now, I figure on $50/year is fair use for a watch, so that $500 watch should last 10 years or be able to re-sell it for $250 after 5.

That said, it's just justification for me in the price range of my current habit. I buy what I like and can afford. I really need to make room in the box for more, what can I sell?
 

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My 2.5 cents is you always should evaluate resale, or retained value, because you really cannot project where you'll be and what your preferences will be 10-15 years down the road.
Since I'm already 71 years old, I don't know if I will even be around 10-15 years from now to consider resale value, I may be in a Nursing home drooling into a spittle cup by then and time keeping will be meaningless LOL!
 
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I always consider resale value if expensive. If a Seiko or orient I don't really care. $200 SKX, what ever, not the end of the world if I loose a couple bucks. But when purchasing something like my Tudor BB, ya, buy used and won't get bent over if I sell. Been almost a year since the Tudor and I'm thinking of "trying"something else. Total non issue, can sell Tudor for what I got it for and move on. Would probably be a $1200 hit if I would have bought it retail.
 

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Personally I don't purchase with an eye toward resale, but I do try to buy what I feel has some longevity in terms of design. If you buy something that has a more classic or iconic style you'll be able to wear it longer as it won't look "dated" as quickly. This also helps with resale if you are someone who does flip watches.

There are trends that come and go. For example I think the oversized watch trend is starting to wane with watch sizes starting to pull back toward the 40mm range. While at the same time rose gold (real or otherwise) seems to be currently all the rage and is most certainly a fad (in my mind) that will limit the long term wearability and ultimately the resale.

Many of us seem obsessed with a movements durability and longevity, but the thing that lands most watches in a drawer after 10 years is the style, not a movement failure.
 

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I don't buy as an investment, but I definitely try to buy wisely, even though all of mine are sub $1000 watches. Buying on sale or used has served me well if I've decided to sell them. Just my conservative nature. Otherwise known as being a tight wad.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Just my conservative nature. Otherwise known as being a tight wad.
Funny, isn't it, how our spend-spend-spend society at large often makes financially responsible consumers a bit defensive.

Nothing "tight wad" about it!

Having just typed that out, I am just now wondering if we can start referring to the others a "loose wads" from this point forward?

:)
 

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When I do buy it's mostly vintage and like many others here, that includes little to no consideration of resale value or investment
 

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Discussion Starter #16
My rule in all purchases in life. "Don't over pay." For depreciable assets such as watches, this usually means buy used. If the watch was worth anything to begin with, it should still be in good shape.
Good rule to live buy! (yes, misspelling and cheap pun intended)
 
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