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I would guess that many of you won't learn a thing from this post, but you never know, somebody may. I have recently acquired a timegrapher, and would strongly advise anyone with an interest in horology to do the same. They give a great incite into how your watches behave, and to some degree, why. There are 4 pieces of information, RATE (+/- seconds per day), AMPLITUDE (The swing angle of the balance arm, which is higher when wound fully), BEAT ERROR (should ideally be no more than 0.5.) PARAMETER (This the lift angle, each movement varies. Timegraphers are set at 52 but you will get more accurate readings if you set the parameters as stated by the manufacturer. easily available on line). You can see how differently the watch performs when wound, to how it performs when it isn't. Believe me, it's very different. You can also see how the performance varies when the watch is at different angles, ie dial up, bezel up etc. To get a reasonable average it is best to take the reading from when the dial is facing up. This tends to replicate normal movement, but of course, depending on how much you move and what you are doing affects the accuracy. I once played golf whilst wearing an Orient Mako, and it gained 4 minutes in three hours. Since then I have never worn a mechanical watch when playing golf. I am happy if my watch is +/- 10 SPD, because most movement manufacturers give you a variance of +40/-30. More expensive movements are normally +20/-10. Some people won't accept anything worse than a few seconds, but I believe those people would just be better off with a quartz watch. I have learned to regulate my own watches, and adjust the beat error myself, so the timegrapher really helps. Just a tip, do NOT attempt to adjust the beat error without a timegrapher. Of course, you can regulate a watch by resetting the timing arm and and see how it performs over a day, but that is a very long winded thing to do. I shall attempt to explain the beat error for those of you who don't know what it is. Having a good beat error will help your watch run more consistently, and means gravity will have less effect on how it performs. The balance wheel swings a bit like a pendulum, and ideally it should swing as far right as it does left, so any difference is the beat error. Ideally it should be zero, but like I quoted earlier, anything up to 0.5 degrees is quite acceptable. To be honest, I wouldn't bother adjusting the beat error for anything below 0.7.

My skills are extremely limited, and I have big fat clumsy fingers, so wouldn't attempt to take on anything to complicates, but it's really interesting having an incite into how and why a mechanical watch performs.
 

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Your post is very helpful! At least to me as I have been contemplating buying one myself for a long time. The one thing that is holding me back is the fear to compromise the water resistance of my watches once I’ve open and removed the back. And that is mainly because I have no means to test it.
 

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Your post is very helpful! At least to me as I have been contemplating buying one myself for a long time. The one thing that is holding me back is the fear to compromise the water resistance of my watches once I’ve open and removed the back. And that is mainly because I have no means to test it.
Treat yourself to a little tub of silicone grease, and put some on the seal before closing the back up. You can also buy a selection of seals from ebay for next to nothing, but always grease them first. I have NEVER had a watch leak as a result of taking the back off, it's all about making sure the seal is seated correctly. If your going to regulate a watch, practice on a cheap one first. It's very easy, you just need to be careful, and use an eye class. If you need to regulate the beat error, always do that first, then the timing arm afterward. The amount of movement for either is absolutely tiny. One millimetre equals about 30 seconds. I have never found a need to regulate an ETA or Sellita movement, and although I know the theory, I am not sure if I would take it on. These movements are adjusted by altering the weights on the balance wheel, unlike simply moving the arms on movements such as Miyota and Seiko NH35's. I strongly suggest you don't get to obsessed with accuracy though. Allow yourself some tolerance, especially as you will always get a slightly different reading every time you put the watch on the timegrapher. If you are obsessive, don't buy one :rolleyes:
 

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OP,

Thanks for the post !
For me, ignorance is bliss in a sense. I have resisted obtaining a TG because I do think it would bug me to find out which of my pieces is running fast or too slow. This is because I do not have the skill set, knowledge , or patience to attempt trying to regulate a watch.
Thereby, leaving me at the mercy of a watchmaker to perform the work...for a fee no less. I salute you and others that can perform this task!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Yes, thank you very much Mrs. Wiggles ! (y)(y) Actually did learn quite
a bit to tell the truth. Honestly did not even realize how many cool things
a Timegrapher can do. It's fascinating, and seems like it actually helps to
immerse you into not only the watch you are checking out. But the hobby
itself ! :D I mean we always will appreciate the outside of watches with
their design, style, history etc. So appreciating how a watch works inside,
or how it's performing is really just as intriguing. Along with being another
great branch of the hobby.

Can imagine it's really terrific to get into sir, and by the way, your skills
sound pretty impressive if you ask me ! 😵 Thanks once again !!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Yes, thank you very much Mrs. Wiggles ! (y)(y) Actually did learn quite
a bit to tell the truth. Honestly did not even realize how many cool things
a Timegrapher can do. It's fascinating, and seems like it actually helps to
immerse you into not only the watch you are checking out. But the hobby
itself ! :D I mean we always will appreciate the outside of watches with
their design, style, history etc. So appreciating how a watch works inside,
or how it's performing is really just as intriguing. Along with being another
great branch of the hobby.

Can imagine it's really terrific to get into sir, and by the way, your skills
sound pretty impressive if you ask me ! 😵 Thanks once again !!!
Not really. I can change batteries, remove and change crowns and stems, and regulate most mechanical watches, but that's it. Only the other week I put a fine screw driver through the main spring of an NH35 movement whilst attempting to regulate it. It wasn't an expensive watch, but one I liked. I once found a chip on the crystal of an Orient Solar watch I owned, and it wasn't a cheap watch. I am quite anal and couldn't live with it. I knew the theory behind removing and replacing a crystal, so set about it. I removed the movement and noticed the indices were attached to the chapter ring, quite an unusual design, but this made it difficult. I put the correct attachments on to my watch press, gave it a squeeze and the crystal shattered into a million pieces. That in it's self wasn't a problem, but all the indices flew around the room, half of which never to be seen again. I have now learned my limitations, but still enjoy gaining knowledge
 

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Not really. I can change batteries, remove and change crowns and stems, and regulate most mechanical watches, but that's it. Only the other week I put a fine screw driver through the main spring of an NH35 movement whilst attempting to regulate it. It wasn't an expensive watch, but one I liked. I once found a chip on the crystal of an Orient Solar watch I owned, and it wasn't a cheap watch. I am quite anal and couldn't live with it. I knew the theory behind removing and replacing a crystal, so set about it. I removed the movement and noticed the indices were attached to the chapter ring, quite an unusual design, but this made it difficult. I put the correct attachments on to my watch press, gave it a squeeze and the crystal shattered into a million pieces. That in it's self wasn't a problem, but all the indices flew around the room, half of which never to be seen again. I have now learned my limitations, but still enjoy gaining knowledge
Well, still am thinking your limitations are beyond most people with this MW.
Remember that old saying you've got to crack a few eggs in order to make
an omelette. 🙂 Am betting that you learned a lot from all these experiences,
and if you did any one of them again, the results would be different, and better. (y)
Like you are saying, it's about enjoying that newly gained knowledge, as well
as having fun. Which it sounds like you are having !
 
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