Watch Freeks banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been changing my own watch batteries for a few years now, and with good results. Of course I have no way to test them after, while I always clean the case back and the seal area and use a little silicone grease on the o-ring. I'm wondering what my chances of having a leak are. I know unless you ask or own a higher end watch, the folks usualy do not test. I have had good luck with my 50m, 100m and 200m. I do not dive only swim never go below 10 to 12 ft. I use to use a jewelery shop that had a watch guy and my Luminox leaked soon after a battery change, so Ilearned to do it myself. Juat wondering what others think.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
12,931 Posts
Such a terrific question rokwldr ! :smileyface_hand_cla

Actually can't give you an answer, because I'm not sure. ..Sounds like you do a fantastic job at sealing it back up though.

Maybe some of the other guys can give you some better insight, along with some answers. :)
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
6,117 Posts
Tricky. Although I have a special tool kit for watches with tools to open almost every case I have never done a battery swap myself on water resistant watches. There is no way to check if it still meets the water resistance figure, you need specialised equipment for. That's why I always took my Citizen to a local dealer. He would send it to the Dutch importer and they performed the battery and O-ring change and the pressure test. For 18 Euro.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
265 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have a couple of Momentum dive watches. For $35-40 send them back and they will replace the battery and test the watch. All that and extend the warranty for two more years, up to three times. I won't be doing those. I have a Pulsar that is 35 years old and used many batteries, New o-rings a few times and never a leak. I did it myself for about half of that time. Has anyone else had a problem after changing a battery?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Seems to me that you are doing all that I would do, and the silicone helps seal and protect the O-ring. I might be inclined to look to replace the O-rings after 12 to 15 years (4-5 battery replacements) assuming you will continue to submerge them, just for safety's sake?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
3,937 Posts
If the gasket is not replaced regularly, ie at battery changes every few years, the risk of a water leak is obviously increased. Sealing an old gasket with silicone at battery change is no guarantee of a waterproof watch.

Recommend you replace the gasket (yourself if you like) and have the watch tested by someone competent to do it.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,444 Posts
Main reason for the silicone gasket grease is not as much to create a waterproof seal (although it helps), as more to decrease the friction and binding on the gasket caused when screwing the caseback back down. You have two metal surfaces going in opposite directions with a rubber gasket in between that is being pulled and twisted as well as compressed. It causes quite a bit of wear and that is why the gaskets should be changed on most watches every couple times the back is removed (more often in "operational watches" that are actually used in extreme environments such as diving).

In my experience, battery changes done by yourself should not harm the water resistance if you are careful, and make sure the gasket is slightly lubricated (a little goes a long way, and you do not want any of the grease to seep into the case), and make sure the gasket is properly seated and does not shift or bind when screwing down the caseback. I would recomend changing out the gasket every other batter change if for any reason other than gaskets are cheap and a good insurance policy.

Interesting side note, you should read up on how the caseback and gasket works on the Vostok Amphibia models. They eliminate the wear and tear on the gasket by using a two piece caseback design (with a thick and wide gasket) that seals harder the more pressure that is applied while diving. Very simple and ingenious and I am surprised more watch makers don't copy their design. It really is an elegant solution to a problem that all watches with screw down casebacks have.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
24,243 Posts
I find that the problem is obtaining the correct replacement gasket. If they were easy to get I'd replace the gasket every time I opened a case back. They are cheap but sometimes elusive. Major brands will allow you to order from them based on the model number. However, some of the boutique brands don't offer that same service or they are hard to get from some suppliers.

If anyone has a source for a nice gasket kit that has the most popular sizes I'd like to ask you to post a link. I know you can buy individual gaskets from several sources, but with a kit you have a better chance of having the correct gasket on hand when you need it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: ganson
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top