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http://www.watchtime.com/blog/watchtoberfest-5-tough-german-sports-watches/#

Germany’s Oktoberfest wrapped up earlier this month, but while the dirndls, lederhosen, and giant beer mugs have gone into storage until next year, we thought it might be a good time to showcase some robust, sporty timepieces from some smaller German watch brands that may have flown under your radar this year. Here are five that made their debut in 2013.
Mühle-Glashütte collaborated with the research divers at the University of Rostock to develop the Rasmus 2000. The watch features hands, numbers, and hour markers coated in Super-LumiNova for increased visibility underwater. The Rasmus 2000 (named after Rasmus, the patron saint of sailors) is able to withstand water pressures down to 2,000 meters and has an automatic movement with a 38-hour power reserve.




Nomos Glashütte’s Ahoi is water-resistant to 200 meters. The watch comes in a 40-mm case with a waterproof black fabric strap. The Ahoi, Nomos’s first true divers’ watch, retails for $3,940.



Sinn’s T1 EZM 14 is the latest in its series of Mission timer watches for professional divers. The watch comes in a 45-mm case made entirely of titanium, and can withstand a depth of 1,000 meters. It also has a dehumidifying system that uses a sulfate desiccant capsule and inert gas to keep oxygen and moisture from entering the case.



Tutima’s M2 comes in a titanium case resistant to shock, moisture, and magnetic influence. The chronograph movement is also surrounded by a combination of soft iron and mu-metal, a magnetically soft nickel-iron alloy that adds further protection from magnetic fields. The hands and hour markers contain a luminescent material.



The UTS 4000M Professional Diver, water-resistant to 4,000 meters, comes in a 45-mm case crafted from a single block of stainless steel. The six-mm-thick sapphire crystal is glued into the case and is also secured by a stainless steel ring with seven hex screws.



Source: Watchtime.com
http://www.watchtime.com/blog/watchtoberfest-5-tough-german-sports-watches/#
 

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Not sure I would classify the Nomos as either "robust" or a "sport watch".
 

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Genius' think alike!! Lol


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The Nomos qualifies. It is certainly well engineered. It it pretty impressive in person.





Definitely well engineered German, and I'm sure a fabulous watch. Strikes me as more of a dress watch than the other 4.
 

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Mark...the Nomos is cool for sure...but I said it before and I will again...not sure how a small, thin, high polished watch like that is either robust or sporty. My opinion...


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All serious contenders. If experience is any clue, all you'll need
to do is get one and wear it and you'll wonder how you ever
got along before without it. I highly doubt you'll be disappointed.


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That UTS is my new grail.
 

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The "looks" of these timepieces are impressive.

I am wondering what movements they are using and if the guts are principally Rhodium and jeweled?

Both the outside and inside of the watches will determine the relative value of the pieces in my book. I have found there to be a difference between an entry level Swiss 2824 movement and a chronometer grade. I have had to replace entry level parts in timepieces but have not had to replace chronometer grade parts. I guess this shows some Swiss bias in me or maybe its just the luck of the Irish!

I consider jeweled movements also to be sturdier, more precisely fine tunable which allows them to be generally more accurate. I think that feature stops somewhere in the low to mid 20's for jewels in that the accuracy and longevity are not really influenced by more jewels. I have found this to be true for both quartz, automatic and wind movements.

Just wanted to share my opinions and observations ... I usually talk to the watch makers when I take my watches in for service and find some of them to be approachable and willing to share their knowledge when they take a break in their home jewelry shop ...
 

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This is German and robust...

http://aegirinstruments.com/?page_id=44

"Equally at home, under a business suit as it is over a diving suit"


...The watch itself was designed inside a dive bell and during
those long hours sitting in decompression...


...The CD-2 including the LE watches, will never number
more than 100pcs...


...Helium relief valve, 7mm screw down, signed crown.
Movement: Soprod A10, Swiss made automatic, 25 Jewels.
Water Resistance Rated for 701 meters...

Crystal
Sapphire, domed, anti scratch with anti reflective coating inside.




I tried to import the pictures you get when you select these
shots, above, on the AEgir website, but no dice. Sorry.

The diver touching his watch underwater is self-explanatory,
but the next shot shows an AEgir carrying case on the shelf
next to a helmet, or whatever-it-is, so you can't really see
what that's all about until you see (in the expanded photo
that I was not able to import) that it's actually a diving bell
helmet* setting on the shelf next to several more diving bell
helmets off to the right on the same shelf, and so the watch
box is a 'shelf item' container for just another piece of diving
equipment, ready for "action."

I couldn't get the next shot to expand at all (on their page),
but it shows the watch kind of sideways so you can see the
polished side around the crown. It's a bit weird that's the only
view of the right side of the watch and then even weirder is
there are no views of the left side. Plus, 'brushed' stainless
steel doesn't shine like that, correct?

"Case: German made 316L Stainless Steel; Brushed finish;
Helium relief valve; 7mm screw down, signed crown."

So where is the helium relief valve? Is it an automatic valve,
like Rolex has, or is it some kind of "Top Secret?"


*When I say "diving bell" I don't mean this:


...nor this (Bell helmet):



...but more like this (diving bell helmet):


...or this (commercial diver's helmet):


P.S.
If you think the watch is expensive, check out the helmets' price tags.


.
 

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The "looks" of these timepieces are impressive.

I am wondering what movements they are using and if the guts are principally Rhodium and jeweled?

Both the outside and inside of the watches will determine the relative value of the pieces in my book. I have found there to be a difference between an entry level Swiss 2824 movement and a chronometer grade. I have had to replace entry level parts in timepieces but have not had to replace chronometer grade parts. I guess this shows some Swiss bias in me or maybe its just the luck of the Irish!

I consider jeweled movements also to be sturdier, more precisely fine tunable which allows them to be generally more accurate. I think that feature stops somewhere in the low to mid 20's for jewels in that the accuracy and longevity are not really influenced by more jewels. I have found this to be true for both quartz, automatic and wind movements.

Just wanted to share my opinions and observations ... I usually talk to the watch makers when I take my watches in for service and find some of them to be approachable and willing to share their knowledge when they take a break in their home jewelry shop ...
Here is the Soprod on my Aegir... ImageUploadedByTapatalk1382715997.983620.jpg
 
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