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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

Question for you…..

I have a small Omega Speedmaster (I believe it is referred to as a “reduced” model coming in at 39mm).

I purchased it back in 2002 on 2003. It sat for many years and I rarely ever wore it.

I’ve recently taken to wearing it again.

It has never been serviced.

I’ve asked two people in the business whether or not it is worth having it serviced. Both, independently said, and I am paraphrasing, “Wear it until wheels fall off and then send it in”.

When I have asked watch repair folks, they have said “Send it in.” Cost would be between $500 and $700.

It runs and keeps time very well as great as I can tell.

I believe that secondary market value is perhaps $2500 and I have no intention of selling it.

Thoughts are appreciated.




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A watch will tell you when it’s time for a trip to the watch doctor ( when it stops working or starts keeping time erratically).

If it ain’t broke….don’t fix it
 

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While one option may be to wear a watch until it starts showing signs of needing attention, the other is one of preventative maintenance and to have it serviced at least every 5-10 years.
Putting it on a timegraph is one way of checking on a watch's "health".

Would you run a car/motorcycle without maintenance until it shows signs of not running well?
 

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Hello,

Question for you…..

I have a small Omega Speedmaster (I believe it is referred to as a “reduced” model coming in at 39mm).

I purchased it back in 2002 on 2003. It sat for many years and I rarely ever wore it.

I’ve recently taken to wearing it again.

It has never been serviced.

I’ve asked two people in the business whether or not it is worth having it serviced. Both, independently said, and I am paraphrasing, “Wear it until wheels fall off and then send it in”.

When I have asked watch repair folks, they have said “Send it in.” Cost would be between $500 and $700.

It runs and keeps time very well as great as I can tell.

I believe that secondary market value is perhaps $2500 and I have no intention of selling it.

Thoughts are appreciated.




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In my opinion, since you've asked elsewhere and gotten answers. So you know you can send this to a private jeweller for 200 USD or less and to Omega for 700 USD or less. And in 19 years according to you it's keeping time as per your satisfaction standards. You want to hear an agreement with your decision to not send it in for a service (again my opinion and conclusion drawn from your statements).

Reflex has the correct response with the necessary explanation and analogy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
In my opinion, since you've asked elsewhere and gotten answers. So you know you can send this to a private jeweller for 200 USD or less and to Omega for 700 USD or less. And in 19 years according to you it's keeping time as per your satisfaction standards. You want to hear an agreement with your decision to not send it in for a service (again my opinion and conclusion drawn from your statements).

Reflex has the correct response with the necessary explanation and analogy.
Thanks for your response.

I asked for thoughts, not agreement. The quoted price for service is between $500 and $700.

I asked for an opinion, based on ones own experience, to send it in or not.


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Keep an eye on the precision and accuracy a while. If it's not to your satisfaction then have it looked in to. Till then, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. jmho, ymmv
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Keep an eye on the precision and accuracy a while. If it's not to your satisfaction then have it looked in to. Till then, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. jmho, ymmv
I’m thinking about taking the leap and buying a timegrapher….but afraid I’ll become obsessed with accuracy….


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I'm no expert on this Gabriel, but am of the if it ain't broke, don't fix it,
or worry mindset. 😊However, really do like the proactive argument
you, and the guys are making about putting it on a timegraph. 😀(y)
Because it's a happy medium really. ..One where you aren't spending
that $500 - $700, but you are still doing something.

It's a really great option, plus it will most likely be a lot of fun to learn
about, as well as get into in general. ..Keep us posted on everything
if you can, or want to.🙂
 

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Thanks for your response.

I asked for thoughts, not agreement. The quoted price for service is between $500 and $700.

I asked for an opinion, based on ones own experience, to send it in or not.


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Dear sir,
Reflex has your question covered. I have vintage watches from 50s, 60s, and 70s which I send in every 2 years to AD (if still around) or private jewellers just to keep them in shape and save them from my hands of destruction. New watches get a service every 3 years, especially the ones I wear to the shower and swimming pool. Rest are serviced every 5 years. Like I typed earlier, Reflex has this ground covered. And since you're still not convinced you want someone to say it's ok to use a watch for 2 decades sans any care since it appears to function satisfactorily to your liking. I rest my case.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm no expert on this Gabriel, but am of the if it ain't broke, don't fix it,
or worry mindset. However, really do like the proactive argument
you, and the guys are making about putting it on a timegraph. (y)
Because it's a happy medium really. ..One where you aren't spending
that $500 - $700, but you are still doing something.

It's a really great option, plus it will most likely be a lot of fun to learn
about, as well as get into in general. ..Keep us posted on everything
if you can, or want to.
Thanks Tom.

I’m going to kick it around for awhile and figure it out after giving it some more wrist time.


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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Dear sir,
Reflex has your question covered. I have vintage watches from 50s, 60s, and 70s which I send in every 2 years to AD (if still around) or private jewellers just to keep them in shape and save them from my hands of destruction. New watches get a service every 3 years, especially the ones I wear to the shower and swimming pool. Rest are serviced every 5 years. Like I typed earlier, Reflex has this ground covered. And since you're still not convinced you want someone to say it's ok to use a watch for 2 decades sans any care since it appears to function satisfactorily to your liking. I rest my case.
Not looking for an argument, or for anyone to rest their case.

Quite frankly, I came into this just looking for some thoughts - not trying to get anyone to verify or support any conclusion that I had already come to. Again, just looking for thoughts/advice/opinions - not convinced one way or the other.

Nothing more then that - but thanks.


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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Has anyone had any experience with Jeff Herman at watchrepair.net?

He has a service whereby he will send you a box to ship the watch back to him and send it to one of his three repair centers. I do not believe he is an authorized Omega repair shop.

Thanks In Advance.


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Hello,

Question for you…..

I have a small Omega Speedmaster (I believe it is referred to as a “reduced” model coming in at 39mm).

I purchased it back in 2002 on 2003. It sat for many years and I rarely ever wore it.

I’ve recently taken to wearing it again.

It has never been serviced.

I’ve asked two people in the business whether or not it is worth having it serviced. Both, independently said, and I am paraphrasing, “Wear it until wheels fall off and then send it in”.

When I have asked watch repair folks, they have said “Send it in.” Cost would be between $500 and $700.

It runs and keeps time very well as great as I can tell.

I believe that secondary market value is perhaps $2500 and I have no intention of selling it.

Thoughts are appreciated.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

Your watch was manufactured 20 years ago. Were I in your shoes, I would have it serviced / oiled. Here is my reasoning:

I do not know if your watch was made using synthetic or natural oils, or a combination of both. However, if you look at Mobius' website (the company belongs to Swatch Group), you will see that the shelf-life of an unopened bottle of one of their lubricants is 6 years, but the shelf-life of an opened one is 12 months : https://www.moebius-lubricants.ch/sites/default/files/security_sheet/tinf_9010_en_1.pdf

Now, is it possible that the oils will still be in good condition after 20 years? Yes, but personally I doubt it. At the same time, am I an expert in evaporation rates of these oils? No. But if you read the top of the PDF, it says:

"100% synthetic universal fluid thin oil based on ether and aliphatic alcohol with excellent resistance to
ageing and good resistance to pressure."

There is no indication of how long it will last, but I would think 20 years is likely going beyond the designed service life of the oil.

For people who say "wear it until it breaks", this is the same ideology of never taking your car for a service, or never adding engine oil, until it breaks. When it does eventually break, the cost of the parts to repair will likely be a lot more than the preventative maintenance. While that may or may not be true for a watch, you also have to take into account that parts for 20 year old movements (if not a standard, mass-produced movement) may become harder to source as time goes on.
 

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Hello,

Question for you…..

I have a small Omega Speedmaster (I believe it is referred to as a “reduced” model coming in at 39mm).

I purchased it back in 2002 on 2003. It sat for many years and I rarely ever wore it.

I’ve recently taken to wearing it again.

It has never been serviced.

I’ve asked two people in the business whether or not it is worth having it serviced. Both, independently said, and I am paraphrasing, “Wear it until wheels fall off and then send it in”.

When I have asked watch repair folks, they have said “Send it in.” Cost would be between $500 and $700.

It runs and keeps time very well as great as I can tell.

I believe that secondary market value is perhaps $2500 and I have no intention of selling it.

Thoughts are appreciated.




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

After doing some research, your watch is an Speedmaster Date Automatic with a case that is +/- 40mm.

It likely has either an Omega 1152 or 1164 (depending on the year of manufacture, if it is 2002 or 2003 it will be the 1152). In either case, the good news is that the movement is based on the ETA 7750.

So, just about any decent watchmaker should be able to clean and oil the movement, so you likely do not need to send it back to Omega for $700, you just need to find a good watchmaker near you (this in itself may or may not be so easy).
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Your watch was manufactured 20 years ago. Were I in your shoes, I would have it serviced / oiled. Here is my reasoning:

I do not know if your watch was made using synthetic or natural oils, or a combination of both. However, if you look at Mobius' website (the company belongs to Swatch Group), you will see that the shelf-life of an unopened bottle of one of their lubricants is 6 years, but the shelf-life of an opened one is 12 months : https://www.moebius-lubricants.ch/sites/default/files/security_sheet/tinf_9010_en_1.pdf

Now, is it possible that the oils will still be in good condition after 20 years? Yes, but personally I doubt it. At the same time, am I an expert in evaporation rates of these oils? No. But if you read the top of the PDF, it says:

"100% synthetic universal fluid thin oil based on ether and aliphatic alcohol with excellent resistance to
ageing and good resistance to pressure."

There is no indication of how long it will last, but I would think 20 years is likely going beyond the designed service life of the oil.

For people who say "wear it until it breaks", this is the same ideology of never taking your car for a service, or never adding engine oil, until it breaks. When it does eventually break, the cost of the parts to repair will likely be a lot more than the preventative maintenance. While that may or may not be true for a watch, you also have to take into account that parts for 20 year old movements (if not a standard, mass-produced movement) may become harder to source as time goes on.
Thank you so much for your response ! I really appreciate all of the time, effort and research.

The oil reference makes total sense to me. Thank you for it!

My wife bought a new car 1 year ago. Because of Covid, she has barely driven the car. I just had the car serviced - oil change and lube - because oil sitting in a car for a year and breaking down makes total sense to me. Now that you have explained the issue of oil deterioration to me, I totally get it.

I found a local watch repair shop. Spoke to one of the guys - nice people, seemed very interested in having me come in to see that shop and show them the watch. That are also a Tudor AD which I hope to be my next watch, so it may be a nice place to visit anyway.

Thank you again for your advice…..I’ll be getting the watch in for service shortly.


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