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http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...oo-big-ip-addresses-run-out-n386081?cid=sm_fb



The Internet as we know it is now officially too big for its britches.

The organization that assigns IP addresses in North America — the numbers that identify every computer, smartphone and device connected to the Internet — ran out of numbers overnight Wednesday. It's not the end of the world, because there's a newer, more robust system rolling out, but it's a milestone in our shared online history, nonetheless.

IP addresses are the four-number strings like 74.125.224.72 that you'll sometimes see in your browser's address bar, in the guts of your smartphone's system settings, or that you might be asked to type in to your cable modem or WiFi router. That address, 74.125.224.72, is one of many that should take you to Google.com.

It's like the highway system. If you're driving through New York, you might take Interstate 95 or I-190 or I-287. But in plain English, it's all the New York State Thruway.

There are five huge nonprofit regional organizations that hand out those addresses around the world. For the first time, the American Registry for Internet Numbers, in charge of North America, had to turn down a request for a block of addresses Wednesday because it didn't have enough.

The Internet as we know it is now officially too big for its britches.
The organization that assigns IP addresses in North America — the numbers that identify every computer, smartphone and device connected to the Internet — ran out of numbers overnight Wednesday. It's not the end of the world, because there's a newer, more robust system rolling out, but it's a milestone in our shared online history, nonetheless.

IP addresses are the four-number strings like 74.125.224.72 that you'll sometimes see in your browser's address bar, in the guts of your smartphone's system settings, or that you might be asked to type in to your cable modem or WiFi router. That address, 74.125.224.72, is one of many that should take you to Google.com.

Ideally, you shouldn't see any impact from the switchover to IPv6, since both systems are meant to work side by side. But adoption by Internet service providers and large public organizations has been slow. Google, which monitors whether you get to it through IPv4 or IPv6, says only 21 percent of its U.S. traffic comes through IPv6 — and that's the highest rate of any country in the world.
 

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Wow!!! That's wild. It's like new area codes being created for the same location. Never thought that would happen for the Internet.
 
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