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Eric, that is extraordinary, and she looks brand new honestly ! :smile-thumb:

It’s one breathtaking guitar, as well as a piece of art work actually.
Thanks for not only the ultra cool pic, but for the thread !!! :rockon:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Here's an old favorite, a Kay thinline from 1960. It's a great player unlike some vintage Kay guitars, just check out that fingerboard wear:





 

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enricosonic:
Ain't there any acoustic axe owner on the forum?

I'm no photo bug, so no pics. Sorry

I've been playing guitar and bass for 70+ years

Right now I own a 1968 (bought in 69) Martin D35.
Paid $550.00 for it in 69. Now who knows the price.

Own an Epiphone AJ45S (a knockoff of Gibson's J45)

Only lectric axe I owned was a 66 Epi 440 solid body.

Also play a Kay Marquis 5/8ths size upright bass in the
bluegrass genre

Lou Snutt
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ain't there any acoustic axe owner on the forum?
More to come but here are a couple of vintage Yamahas here in the house. A 1969 FG-300, bears a little resemblance to the Gibson Hummingbird, but has an odd tune-o-matic style bridge. This is the way they came.



And my first ever guitar purchase, a 1970 FG-230, bought used in 1983. I thought I was being clever in getting a 12 string, you know, just take off the other 6 strings and you have two guitars in one! Not exactly of course:



These are when Yamaha really got serious about acoustics, setting their sights on Martin and Gibson. They're a great brand in their own right but'll never command those Martin/Gibson big bucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Here's a funky Danelectro 64, which is Danelectro's take on a Mosrite Ventures model, little different body shape, pickups and pickup location, plus a Bigsby trem unit instead of Mosrite's Vibramute.

Danelectros are always kind of fun and won't break the bank. This is my only guitar with a zero fret, right there under the metal nut. The bridge pickup can be split via a push/pull tone knob, a coil tap basically. Kind of a surf meets spaghetti western tone.







 

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I was just watching a guitar repair video where the guitar being repaired had a zero fret, What do you think of it? does it work well?

And is the Bigsby made out of steel or aluminum? If it's steel it must have great sustain but add a lot of weight?

When I first got my new guitar the first thing I did before I even played it was swap out the wimpy sustain block for a fat tungsten block I had from the guitar before this one, it made a big dif on it so... That block really added more weight than you would think but the sustain rings for days and the tone is great!





And while I had the trem off I swapped out the stock string saddles for some GT graphite string saver saddles...




On that Tele headstock, the standard small HS was the only thing that kept me from pulling the trigger on one because I've never been a fan of that HS BUT I've always liked the HS on your Tele so to me yours is like a super Tele! The best of both guitars...

Don't Tele's normally have 7" radius neck if I remember correctly?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Don't Tele's normally have 7" radius neck if I remember correctly?
Vintage Teles were 7.25" radius but more modern models are 9.5". I like a 12" radius and the Deluxe I think is the only Tele to offer that... I don't know much about zero frets, supposedly they add tuning and intonation stability and can hide the shortcomings of poorly cut nuts. That sounds painful. ;-)

Compared to your setup, the Bigsby is dated of course. Mostly aluminum with a steel handle I believe.
 

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Vintage Teles were 7.25" radius but more modern models are 9.5". I like a 12" radius and the Deluxe I think is the only Tele to offer that... I don't know much about zero frets, supposedly they add tuning and intonation stability and can hide the shortcomings of poorly cut nuts. That sounds painful. ;-)

Compared to your setup, the Bigsby is dated of course. Mostly aluminum with a steel handle I believe.
Well, I have seen a lot of people talk about this makes for great sustain and that makes for great sustain and they will talk about stuff like "tone wood" or whatever BUT I believe it comes down to the string anchoring points and even more so how unmovable or immovable if you will those anchoring points are, of course, how ridged the structure is between the two anchoring points plays a role BUT all things being equal you don't want the two anchoring points of each string to move at all if you looking for the longest possible sustain and mass at those anchoring points goes a long way towards that goal, It's just physics.

I could go into it in more depth but I think that's enough depth for a watch forum...

The Bigsby may be dated but they got a lot right as it looks like it's stout enough to not transmit a lot of the strings' vibrations into the guitar which bleeds off the strings' sustain...

Eddie Van Halen uses to screw his pickups right to the body of the guitar because he felt it sounded better but I don't think he knew why that was, It's because of some of the strings vibration are always transmitted into the guitar which in turn vibrates the guitar body and with the pickup screwed right to the body the pickup also vibrates and in a small way some of the strings wasted vibration lost to the guitar is recaptured and goes back into creating the sound that is in turn amplified with the guitar amp...

He used to call "it" that "brown sound" that he was always looking for...
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Okay, not as many guitarists as I thought around here, not yet at at least...

This is the guitar that hooked me as a young boy. In the early '70's, I found this 1961 Guild T-100 that my grandfather kept in a case under his bed. Whenever we visited, I crawled under there and got it out, he was happy just to see it being used I think. Decades later I inherited it.


 

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Okay, not as many guitarists as I thought around here, not yet at at least...

This is the guitar that hooked me as a young boy. In the early '70's, I found this 1961 Guild T-100 that my grandfather kept in a case under his bed. Whenever we visited, I crawled under there and got it out, he was happy just to see it being used I think. Decades later I inherited it.


OMG that was so nice of him to leave such a wonderful guitar to you! Not only is it a wonderful guitar but every time you look at it or play it it will remind you of him which is something only you and you alone will get from that guitar!

Back to the Danelectro 64 for a second id I can, I just now noticed, Is that a roller bridge on the guitar???

And I must say WHAT A AMAZING COLLECTION of guitars you have!!! How many more guitars like those do you have in your collection???

I mean I only have the one guitar (for the moment) so I can't imagine what it's like to have so many great guitars to chose from?
 
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