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I have a question for you Seiko watch experts. I know that Citizen cells it's movements to other watchmakers in the form of the 9015 among others. Does Seco so it's watch movements to other watch manufactures?


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Yes. Seiko Instruments Inc (SII) are their movements. They have versions of many of their popular in-house movements sold with different names.

Ex.
Seiko 6R15 is the SII NE15
Seiko 4R35/4R36 is the SII NH35/NH36
Seiko 7S25 is the SII NH25
 

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Yes. Seiko Instruments Inc (SII) are their movements. They have versions of many of their popular in-house movements sold with different names.

Ex.
Seiko 6R15 is the SII NH15
Seiko 4R35/4R36 is the SII NH35/NH36
Seiko 7S26 is the SII NH26
Not sure if anyone knows but are the movements built exactly the same as the ones you'd get in a Seiko Diver? As in do they have many of the ISO6425 attributes such as antimagnetic to 4800 Amp and shock-resistant?
 

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Not sure if anyone knows but are the movements built exactly the same as the ones you'd get in a Seiko Diver? As in do they have many of the ISO6425 attributes such as antimagnetic to 4800 Amp and shock-resistant?
To my knowledge, there is no discernible difference. They are just branded and marketed for use outside of Seiko. The shock-resistance should not be any different since the design is identical. I'm not sure about anti-magnetic, but I assumed (and could be wrong) that that had a little more to do with the case.
 

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To my knowledge, there is no discernible difference. They are just branded and marketed for use outside of Seiko. The shock-resistance should not be any different since the design is identical. I'm not sure about anti-magnetic, but I assumed (and could be wrong) that that had a little more to do with the case.
I agree. Because these (excellent) movements are entirely mass produced, it would be more expensive to alter the design and thus the tooling and production process just to produce a different technical version. Soft iron inserts in the case provide for anti-magnetic properties. More expensive movements have intrinsic anti-magnetic properties, like non ferrous mainsprings. I can't believe I just wrote this :D
 

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IMO the movement is the cheap part of a watch.

As an example, the kinetic divers in my avatar is 20years old. It was £295 back then.
The equivalent watch is approx £295 to buy today.

Approx 10 years ago i sent my watch off to Seiko for a service.
I asked what they were going to do - they said they take the back off, remove the movement & replace it with new, then reseal.
Including shipping, the service was £65 inc tax, so approx £55 without tax. Say shipping cost them £5, I estimate we are looking at maximum of £20 cost for the movement.

(i asked for any parts removed to be returned back to me, so i have a movement & a bent second hand in a little bag - i guess they bent the hand at some point).
 

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IMO the movement is the cheap part of a watch.

As an example, the kinetic divers in my avatar is 20years old. It was £295 back then.
The equivalent watch is approx £295 to buy today.

Approx 10 years ago i sent my watch off to Seiko for a service.
I asked what they were going to do - they said they take the back off, remove the movement & replace it with new, then reseal.
Including shipping, the service was £65 inc tax, so approx £55 without tax. Say shipping cost them £5, I estimate we are looking at maximum of £20 cost for the movement.

(i asked for any parts removed to be returned back to me, so i have a movement & a bent second hand in a little bag - i guess they bent the hand at some point).
Kinetic, solar, and quartz movements are notoriously inexpensive compared to automatics. Most times you will find replacing one of those movements is far cheaper than servicing it. Automatics, depending on the movement, are usually closer to the break even point on the repair/replace scale (or more expensive to replace). It really depends on the movement. If my watch guy charges $125 to service/repair a Seiko 7S26 movement from my SKX007, then it is cheaper for me to replace the movement (or even the whole watch). On the same note, if that same $125 will service the 8L35 in my Marine Master, then servicing is a hell of a lot cheaper than I could ever get a new movement for.
 

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Ganson:

Did you notice Invicta is having the counterweights on the NH35's
as used in their models number 9404, 9110, 8926 et al, with yellow
color treatment? Whyzzat?

There is a watch distributor whose name won't be mentioned that
either has no idea, or are constrained by their management to pull back
on questions of movement calibre on some watches they sell.

I emailed them 3 times regarding a watch they sell and couldn't get
a straight answer from them. Heckkuva way to run a RR.

Lou Snutt
 

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Ganson:

Did you notice Invicta is having the counterweights on the NH35's
as used in their models number 9404, 9110, 8926 et al, with yellow
color treatment? Whyzzat?

There is a watch distributor whose name won't be mentioned that
either has no idea, or are constrained by their management to pull back
on questions of movement calibre on some watches they sell.

I emailed them 3 times regarding a watch they sell and couldn't get
a straight answer from them. Heckkuva way to run a RR.

Lou Snutt
I had one years ago with the Miyota 8225 that had one of Invictas decorated rotors. Cheap way to doll up a cheap movement for watches with exhibition casebacks. Never had an issue with them not advertising properly the movement calibre, although I have heard stories of questionable ETA movements being used.

I for one tend to ignore that company as a whole these days. Nothing they do interests me.
 
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