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Im thinking about buying a Orient MAko for my nephew for his Graduation and he actually does go scuba diving. Need to know if the Mako can actually be used for diving because I've seen certain revues saying Orient says not to use as a diver.
 

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+1 on what Ted said.

A proper diver only needs to be rated to 150-200 meters as you are most likely NEVER going to dive anywhere near that depth.

Watches like the Seiko SKX and Orient Mako are tool divers. Inexpensive, reliable, with good depth ratings.
 

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it says on their website not to use mako as a true diver only skin diving. I'll probably go with a citizen or a seiko. Maybe a deep blue if i can get one for below my $200 goal

"Crisp and clean, the CEM65008B is a standard watch with a diver twist. Perfect for the scuba diver with a day job, the Black Ray is undeniably stylish and functional.


**Appropriate for skin diving only"
 

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WR to 660ft and appropriate for skin diving? Something is not right.
Yeah, really. Bet it has to do with the quick change day pusher. It screws tight but just another place for water to enter.

But like you say, something ain't right, it either is or isn't.
 

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Surprising, but you're probably right that it has to do with the pusher.

Snag up a Seiko SKX diver then. There will be no issues with that as it is an ISO diver rated to 200m with a screw down crown.
 

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I wouldn't hesitate. Just make sure all the pushers are locked down.




http://
 

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it says on their website not to use mako as a true diver only skin diving. I'll probably go with a citizen or a seiko. Maybe a deep blue if i can get one for below my $200 goal

"Crisp and clean, the CEM65008B is a standard watch with a diver twist. Perfect for the scuba diver with a day job, the Black Ray is undeniably stylish and functional.


**Appropriate for skin diving only"
Perhaps their quality control is insufficient on those lower end models? :eek: (he says, proudly wearing an OS300)

Seriously, if you want a proper diver get one designed for it. WR ratings are frequently a joke, as you can see here.

Some good suggestions in this thread.

I personally prefer eco drive or solar divers for actual diving as i tend to beat them up pretty bad.
YMMV.


Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2
 

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I emailed Orient USA to try and get clarification.

If I hear back, I'll let you know.
Good looking out Ted.

Serious divers have dive computers and have a watch as a backup/afterthought. Any decent ISO rated diver will do. The notes on the Mako surprised me since orient has a history of solid dive watches. Anything with a screw down crown, timing bezel, and 150 plus meter WR will do. I've done a little diving, but a ton of snorkeling, and my Seiko's have always served me well for that.
 

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the Mako isn't up to ISO 6425 spec- no lume on the second hand is the first thing that stands out on that model

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_6425


Wikipedia said:
ISO 6425 divers' watches standard

The standards and features for diving watches are regulated by the ISO 6425 - Divers' watches international standard. This standard was introduced in 1996. ISO 6425 defines such watches as: A watch designed to withstand diving in water at depths of at least 100 m and possessing a system to control the time. Diving watches are tested in static or still water under 125% of the rated (water) pressure, thus a watch with a 200-metre rating will be water resistant if it is stationary and under 250 metres of static water. ISO 6425 testing of the water resistance or water-tightness and resistance at a water overpressure as it is officially defined is fundamentally different from non-dive watches, because every single watch has to be tested. Testing diving watches for ISO 6425 compliance is voluntary and involves costs, so not every manufacturer present their watches for certification according to this standard.
ISO 6425 testing of a diver's watch consists of:
Reliability under water. The watches under test shall be immersed in water to a depth of 30 cm ± 2 cm for 50 hours at 18 °C to 25 °C and all the mechanisms shall still function correctly. The condensation test shall be carried out before and after this test to ensure that the result is related to the above test.
Condensation test. The watch shall be placed on a heated plate at a temperature between 40 °C and 45 °C until the watch has reached the temperature of the heated plate (in practice, a heating time of 10 minutes to 20 minutes, depending on the type of watch, will be sufficient). A drop of water, at a temperature of 18 °C to 25 °C shall be placed on the glass of the watch. After about 1 minute, the glass shall be wiped with a dry rag. Any watch which has condensation on the interior surface of the glass shall be eliminated.
Resistance of crowns and other setting devices to an external force. The watches under test shall be subjected to an overpressure in water of 125% of the rated pressure for 10 minutes and to an external force of 5 N perpendicular to the crown and pusher buttons (if any). The condensation test shall be carried out before and after this test to ensure that the result is related to the above test.
Water-tightness and resistance at a water overpressure. The watches under test shall be immersed in water contained in a suitable vessel. Then an overpressure of 125% of the rated pressure shall be applied within 1 minute and maintained for 2 hours. Subsequently the overpressure shall be reduced to 0.3 bar within 1 minute and maintained at this pressure for 1 hour. The watches shall then be removed from the water and dried with a rag. No evidence of water intrusion or condensation is allowed.
Resistance to thermal shock. Immersion of the watch in 30 cm ± 2 cm of water at the following temperatures for 10 minutes each, 40 °C, 5 °C and 40 °C again. The time of transition from one immersion to the other shall not exceed 1 minute. No evidence of water intrusion or condensation is allowed.
An optional test originating from the ISO 2281 tests (but not required for obtaining ISO 6425 approval) is exposing the watch to an overpressure of 200 kPa. The watch shall show no air-flow exceeding 50 μg/min.
Except the thermal shock resistance test all further ISO 6425 testing should be conducted at 18 °C to 25 °C temperature. Regarding pressure ISO 6425 defines: 1 bar = 105 Pa = 105 N/m2. The required 125% test pressure provides a safety margin against dynamic pressure increase events, water density variations (seawater is 2% to 5% denser than freshwater) and degradation of the seals.
Movement induced dynamic pressure increase is sometimes the subject of urban myths and marketing arguments for diver's watches with high water resistance ratings. When a diver makes a fast swimming movement of 10 m/s (32.8 ft/s) (the best competitive swimmers and finswimmers do not move their hands nor swim that fast[2]) physics dictates that the diver generates a dynamic pressure of 50 kPa or the equivalent of 5 metres of additional water depth.[3]
Besides water resistance standards to a minimum of 100 metres (330 ft) depth rating ISO 6425 also provides minimum requirements for mechanical diver's watches (quartz and digital watches have slightly differing readability requirements) such as:[4]
The presence of a time-preselecting device, for example a unidirectional rotating bezel or a digital display. Such a device shall be protected against inadvertent rotation or wrong manipulation. If it is a rotating bezel, it shall have a minute scale going up to 60 min. The markings indicating every 5 min shall be clearly indicated. The markings on the dial, if existing, shall be coordinated with those of the preselecting device and shall be clearly visible. If the preselecting device is a digital display, it shall be clearly visible.
The following items of the watch shall be legible at a distance of 25 cm (9.8 in) in the dark:
time (the minute hand shall be clearly distinguishable from the hour hand);
set time of the time-preselecting device;
indication that the watch is running (This is usually indicated by a running second hand with a luminous tip or tail.);
in the case of battery-powered watches, a battery end-of-life indication.
The presence of an indication that the watch is running in total darkness. This is usually indicated by a running second hand with a luminous tip or tail.
Magnetic resistance. This is tested by 3 expositions to a direct current magnetic field of 4 800 A/m. The watch must keep its accuracy to ± 30 seconds/day as measured before the test despite the magnetic field.
Shock resistance. This is tested by two shocks (one on the 9 o'clock side, and one to the crystal and perpendicular to the face). The shock is usually delivered by a hard plastic hammer mounted as a pendulum, so as to deliver a measured amount of energy, specifically, a 3 kg hammer with an impact velocity of 4.43 m/s. The change in rate allowed is ± 60 seconds/day.
Resistance to salty water. The watches under test shall be put in a 30 g/l NaCl (sodium chloride) solution and kept there for 24 hours at 18 °C to 25 °C. This test water solution has salinity comparable to normal seawater. After this test, the case and accessories shall be examined for any possible changes. Moving parts, particularly the rotating bezel, shall be checked for correct functioning.
Resistance of attachments to an external force (strap/band solidity). This is tested by applying a force of 200 N (45 lbf) to each springbar (or attaching point) in opposite directions with no damage to the watch of attachment point. The bracelet of the watch being tested shall be closed.
Marking. Watches conforming to ISO 6425 are marked with the word DIVER’S WATCH L M or DIVER'S L M to distinguish diving watches from look a like watches that are not suitable for actual scuba diving. The letter L indicates the diving depth, in metres, guaranteed by the manufacturer.
 
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