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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Prompted by Gary's post about the ultra thin Piaget I now will bore the pants off of you all by yet again a visit back to memory lane.


The year must have been 1978 or early 1979. As a teenager I was still living with my parents and we happened to live above two brothers that ran a watch repair shop. From time to time I just sat there to have a chat and watch them work. One of the brothers was very absent minded and he completely lost track of the Sicura chronograph I brought in for repair. He ordered a new one for me and all was well again.

My interest in watches was sparked well before that and because of that I visited the Technical Library that was situated in a huge building complex that also housed a theatre and several schools, including a school for fine mechanics, AKA a watchmaker school.

The carpet in that library was made of nylon so a I hardly dared to come too close to the metal racks afraid of getting an electrical shock caused by static build up. (I still have this issue, I seem to attract it :D). Bu that didn't stop me from reading the abundant collection of books and magazines on watches and the Concord Delirium was prominently featured in one of those magazines. I was mesmerised by that watch and mentioned it to the watchmakers.

They had seen it on a trade show but were not very enthusiastic about it. "If you wear the strap even so much too tight, the crystal will pop off when you flex your wrist because the watch will warp". OK, yeah, sure. Now I know why they mentioned this. Watches like these and well, all quartz watches that followed rendered them out of work. They were reduced to battery changers. Back then mind you, now qualified watch makers are in high demand again.

But in those magazines (and in the shop windows of a very high class watch dealer) were other watches that really peaked my interest. One of them was the Piaget Polo. There was a time that I would hide the fact that I once liked this watch but not now. There is something fascinating about it and its Concord clone. I'm beyond shame now :D 18 carat gold of course and quartz.










 

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Your thread encapsulates what it is to be drawn to the wristwatch. We all have differing tales that end up with more or less the same result. Be it gold-toned, stainless, diver, dress, quartz or mechanical.

Here’s to being a WatchFreek. Especially one that is beyond shame ;-)
 

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Yeah, definitely nothing to be ashamed of there Frans ! :clapping-hands-abov:)
Actually is something to be 100% proud of, and enjoyed
honestly sir. I mean we are interested in this hobby for
so many reasons, and one of the reasons is because we
are fascinated in watches, and not just one kind of style,
but each, and every kind ! :thumb::thumb:

What's just as extraordinary as the watch here, is getting
to hear stories from you just like this one above. Love it
sir, and it's something that could never be boring by the
way !!! :) Thank YOU !
 

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Discussion Starter #6
WF;

Anybody bored by GoodWatch's posts?

Not me!!

Lou Snutt
I'm glad you feel that way my friend. I realise that I tend to reminisce about days gone by a tad too often but I cannot help myself.

The world we live in now runs at a pace that is totally incomparable to that of my childhood. I was born in 1960 and in that era everything was neatly organised along very recognisable patterns. Father was the breadwinner, mother was the home maker. In fact, my mother who was a registered nurse in a children's hospital, was handed her notice as soon as she became married. Completely legal back then, an abomination now.

The street we lived in was quiet and only occupied by a handful of cars as blue collar workers did not earn enough to own a car. For us children it was a haven as we were not expected to loiter around the house but play outside. No electronic gizmos, smartphones, video games or whatever stuff that renders children in our era into couch potatoes, glued to their screens. Sad, very sad.
 
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