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As my daughters would say "OMG"! What a stunning line of watches. If you have an AD in your area that might be carrying this line, do yourself a favor and stop in for a look. I have never seenhands sweep like the hands on this watch, it was smoother than anything I have ever seen. Not so much as even one slight hesitation, just a constant smooth constantsweep. Even the best of the best that I have seen have a very, very slight stutter but not this watch.This is the model I looked at except it was on a bracelet. The price may make you loose your lunch but talk about a sweet watch!



 

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Here is a cool one


[align=center]Seiko Spring Drive Chrono LE II
[/align] Presenting the only chronograph in the world to measure elapsed time in glide motion, the Spring Drive Chronograph. The hallmark of the technology, the “glide motion,” is how 7 of the 8 hands on the dial move: the central hour and minute hands and subsidiary seconds at 9 form the standard timing. Then the 12-hour at 4, the larger 30-minute at 2, and the central seconds form the spectacular chronograph, which never misses a fraction of a second. The chronograph second hand stops precisely when the button is pressed, not at the nearest second or 1/10 second. A small red central GMT hand charts your time in a second time zone. A 72-hour power reserve indicator is located in the arc between 6 and 7 o’clock. This special chronograph maintains the +/- 1-second accuracy of the Spring Drive standard with its replacement of the escapement by Seiko’s Tri-synchro regulator. The 416-part and 50-jewel movement is enclosed within a titanium case and fits to your wrist with extra scratch-resistant titanium alloy bracelet. Turn the Spring Drive Chrono over to view the gold-coloured glide wheel that regulates the precision. Limited edition of 300 pieces.

Case Thickness: 16 mm
Closure: Deployant Push Button Clasp
Warranty: 1-year
Water Resistance: 10ATM/100M/330 F
Color: White Dial/Silver
Case Material: Stainless Steel
Case Diameter: 43 mm
Case Finish: Polished
Crystal: Sapphire
Power Reserve: 72 hour
Band: Stainless Steel Bracelet
Luminosity: Hands and Markers
Caseback: Mineral Crystal Exhibition
Movement: Spring Drive
Engraveable: No
Limited edition of 300

I have seen listed as high at $6000!!
 

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The one I looked at was listed at $6800.00. It was heavier than I though it would be but it was absolutely beautiful. Seiko has revolutionized the watch industry with this new movement which is referred to as an automatic hybrid. I'm sure after time there will be other manufacturers that will copy the design of the movement and make just enough changes so that they don't infringe on copyrights and the prices will drop. I wouldn't even consider one right now, not at those prices.
 

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TUNAKLLR wrote:
THAT is an awesome piece!
It kind of has that same look as your Oris! Different but has that same flair to it!
 

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TUNAKLLR wrote:
RipitRon wrote:
TUNAKLLR wrote:
Definitely has that flair, but at $2800 more! Yikes!
Yeah they are quite proud of it arent they!
Apparently so. From what I understand, it's a complex, quality movement.
There is so much BS into this whole movement thing and the dollar associated with it. It cracks me up, when I read that a movement cost over $20K. It is like anything else, it is a want not a necessity which is why they charge what they do! Lets just say that a the materials to product a turb cost $3K which is BS, and it took 1 swiss guy 80hr @ $100.00 an hr which is also BS, the movement would cost $11K. the mark-up on this stuff is crazy money.
 

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One of the main reasons I refuse too own ever again any Omega, Breitling, Rolex Etc!Etc!Etc! it is all a farce IMO!!!
 

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Seiko and Citizen have always lead and will continue to lead the market in fine timepieces. I have never had one problem with any of my Seiko's or Citizen's. I can't say the same about many other brand names that I own.
 

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Watchguru58 wrote:
Seiko and Citizen have always lead and will continue to lead the market in fine timepieces. I have never had one problem with any of my Seiko's or Citizen's. I can't say the same about many other brand names that I own.
Agree'd and I dont think you will get an argument from many people either. I think the main issue I have with this watch as well as many others, I dont give a flyin &*@# what country it is made in, they are making a BOAT load of money @ $6800!!!
 

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The main thing about jewelery in general is the retailers are making margins that no other retailer can even price their products. Imagine Walmart charging $20 for a 2 liter bottle of Coke...now you are in the margins jewelers can make. Now, from the articles I have read about Shopnbc, they are making 40% margins on watches...which is excellent.

For those who would like to know the difference....Mr.H..what my kids call me...will give you a little bit of help from Retail Management 3101....

How to calculate markup percentage
By definition, the markup percentage calculation is cost X markup percentage, and then add that to the original unit cost to arrive at the sales price.

For example, if a product costs $100, the selling price with a 25% markup would be $125:

Gross Profit Margin = Sales Price - Unit Cost = $125 - $100 = $25.

Markup Percentage = Gross Profit Margin/Unit Cost = $25/$100 = 25%.

Sales Price = Cost X Markup Percentage + Cost = $100 X 25% + $100 = $125.




How to calculate gross margin percentage

Gross margin defined is Gross Profit/Sales Price. In this example, the gross margin is $25. This results in a 20% gross margin percentage:

Gross Margin Percentage = Gross Profit/Sales Price = $25/$125 = 20%.

Not quite the “margin percentage” we were looking for. So, how do we determine the selling price given a desired gross margin? It’s all in the inverse…of the gross margin formula, that is. By simply dividing the cost of the product or service by the inverse of the gross margin equation, you will arrive at the selling price needed to achieve the desired gross margin percentage.

For example, if a 25% gross margin percentage is desired, the selling price would be $133.33 and the markup rate would be 33.3%:

Sales Price = Unit Cost/(1 - Gross Margin Percentage) = $100/(1 - .25) = $133.33

Markup Percentage = (Sales Price - Unit Cost)/Unit Cost = ($133.33 - $100)/$100 = 33.3%



Markup vs Gross Margin; Which is Preferable?

Though markup is often used by operations or sales departments to set prices it often overstates the profitability of the transaction. Mathematically markup is always a larger number when compared to the gross margin. Consequently, non-financial individuals think they are obtaining a larger profit than is often the case. By calculating sales prices in gross margin terms they can compare the profitability of that transaction to the economics of the financial statements.



Steps to minimize Markup vs Margin mistakes

Terminology and calculations aside, it is very important to remember that there are more factors that affect the selling price than merely cost. What the market will bear, or what the customer is willing to pay, will ultimately impact the selling price. The key is to find the price that optimizes profits while maintaining a competitive advantage.Below are steps you can take to avoid confusion when working with markup rates vs margin rates:

- use a pricing model or pricing tool to quote sales. Have the tool calculate both the markup percentage and the gross margin percentage

- relate gross margin percentage per sales invoice to income statement

- organize your chart of accounts to compare gross margin rate to sales quotes

- educate your sales force on the differences. By targeting the gross margin percentage vs the markup percentage you can throw an additional 2 - 3 percent profit to the bottom line!


So...now you can do the math for yourself..... With a good calculator, you can take the price you paid for a watch, a margin of 40% and come pretty close to figuring out what the Shop is paying for a watch. Then...check the retail price for the same watch at a jeweler...and you will pass out when you see the what the profit margin is...a whole lot.

How do I know...my sister-in-law was a manager at a local chain store jeweler at a mall in El Paso...and she told me what her margins were. Plus...she got things at cost plus 5%...and she got her & my brothers wedding rings from her store. I saw the retail price of her rings....verse what she paid for them....the difference was unreal. Before she left...she got me two really expensive Seiko's for a song!!!
 

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Interesting Larry, i learn something new every day!

Spring Drives are sweet watches. Don, I think "auto hybrid" movements will start becoming more available as demand grows, and (hopefully) prices will start dropping. The watch industry is very slow to make major moves but this could be one coming up.
 

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FreeDive wrote:
Interesting Larry, i learn something new every day!

Spring Drives are sweet watches. Don, I think "auto hybrid" movements will start becoming more available as demand grows, and (hopefully) prices will start dropping. The watch industry is very slow to make major moves but this could be one coming up.
I agree Andrew but I thinkyou will soon see these movements or variations of this movement coming out in 1 or 2 years from other companies. If you get the chance pop in and take a look at this watch, it will blow you away. It feels as solid as any watch I have ever held.
 

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I hope the price drops too! But for now and I think in the forseeable future this movement will be exclusive and we'll have to pay to play. How many years do you think until something like this becomes generally affordable?
 

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That SPS003 is a very nice watch, they are very heavy (much more than the Grand Seiko).
There has been some odd replies in this thread.
From a personal stand point as an owner of these, it is something you really need to own to see the value in it, not for everyone that is for sure.
The Seiko Spring Drives are reasonably priced for the quality you are getting (comparing to anything remotely close in build quality) and so far as accuracy goes, well they are simply the best around.
If anyone is thinking of buying one *seriously* then do it, you wont regret owning one, you will enjoy it so much that you will want to buy another :pk
 
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