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Found this article pretty interesting

https://gearpatrol.com/2019/05/08/railroad-influence-on-watchmaking/


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Thanks! These kind of articles are indeed interesting and to me it's hard to image that 150 years ago almost every major town and province in my tiny country had their own local time! But only the well to do travelled back then, most people never left their village so a different time in another city didn't matter. Let alone the fact that very few people actually owned a personal timepiece. How 'times' have changed!
 

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Fascinating DubyaDubya ! :thumb::thumb:

You know have always thought railroad watches were so neat, but actually
never knew about the impact they actually had on us telling time. Really is
incredible, and you have to wonder how things would be if trains, and the
railroads hadn't existed. :eek: It would be like some strange alternate universe.
Where we not only didn't have railroad watches, but didn't tell time in the
same way either.

Honestly is beyond cool to read about. ..Thanks a lot for posting !!!
 

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Interesting for sure.

"Omega’s Railmaster references a different period of railway history, having been designed to protect the movement specifically from the magnetic fields encountered by railroad staff in the 1950s."

What magnetic fields might those have been?
 

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Interesting for sure.

"Omega’s Railmaster references a different period of railway history, having been designed to protect the movement specifically from the magnetic fields encountered by railroad staff in the 1950s."

What magnetic fields might those have been?

Lots of electrically powered trains in the 50s. Plenty of mag fields on those, not to mention switching equipment and the like on diesel trains.
 

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AT:
That'd be Lou Snutt pictured to the right of the passenger conduct hacking
watches. Wish I had a dime for every time I hacked one or tuther of my RR
grade Hamilton pocketwatches before a train trip.
May have overlooked it in the article but because of so many trainwrecks the
guvment tasked the Prez of Ball Watches with developing a standard in RR
watches. Some standards were the size, number of jewels (at least 21 BTW)
and ability to keep time within a certain % in 6 positions.
Watches had to be inspected and or cleaned every 2 years. And certified by
a watch inspector. My city had 2 inspectors. Each operating dept employee had
a card signed by an inspector certifying inspection had been done. Most inspect-
ors had loaner waches we could use while our watches were in for inspection.
The 70's brought in RR grade wristie models. Hammy had their 505, Bulova
the 214 or the 218. Ball had a wristie as well. All better than the run of the mill
watches worn by non RRers.To my knowledge Waltham and Illinois never sold
wrist watches. The Illinois "Bunn Special" was a particular fave of engineers.
I worked for 3 RRs for 40 years. The CRI&P, the Frisco and the Union Pacific.
My 2 Hammy pocketwatches were the 992b and the 950b. Wristie was the Bulova
214,

Lou Snutt
 

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AT:
That'd be Lou Snutt pictured to the right of the passenger conduct hacking
watches. Wish I had a dime for every time I hacked one or tuther of my RR
grade Hamilton pocketwatches before a train trip.
May have overlooked it in the article but because of so many trainwrecks the
guvment tasked the Prez of Ball Watches with developing a standard in RR
watches. Some standards were the size, number of jewels (at least 21 BTW)
and ability to keep time within a certain % in 6 positions.
Watches had to be inspected and or cleaned every 2 years. And certified by
a watch inspector. My city had 2 inspectors. Each operating dept employee had
a card signed by an inspector certifying inspection had been done. Most inspect-
ors had loaner waches we could use while our watches were in for inspection.
The 70's brought in RR grade wristie models. Hammy had their 505, Bulova
the 214 or the 218. Ball had a wristie as well. All better than the run of the mill
watches worn by non RRers.To my knowledge Waltham and Illinois never sold
wrist watches. The Illinois "Bunn Special" was a particular fave of engineers.
I worked for 3 RRs for 40 years. The CRI&P, the Frisco and the Union Pacific.
My 2 Hammy pocketwatches were the 992b and the 950b. Wristie was the Bulova
214,

Lou Snutt
Knew you would love DD's article here Art, and be able to shed
even further light on not only some of the watches, but just the
railroad in general sir ! :smileyface_hand_cla ..It's remarkable, and is so
interesting it's not even funny to tell the truth.

I don't think a lot of people know all of that, or even a small portion
of it actually. Thanks a lot for all of the insight, along with history
lesson !!! :thumb::thumb:
 
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