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I recently purchased a Wolf 2.7 winder. To test the winder I inserted a Seiko 5, 7S26 which had been regulated to run consistently at +4 seconds per day on the wrist for 14 hours, resting crown down the rest of the time. Per the Orbita database, the recommended TPD for this movement is 500-950 TPD. I set the winder at 750 TPD bi-directional. After one week in the winder, the watch came out significantly faster, running +32 seconds in the first 24 hours.

How could this happen to a watch that was running so well? The wolf 2.7 turns the watch in four cycles over 6 hours for a total of the TPD's programmed, and then rests for 18 hours each day. I expected some variation due to the resting positions in the winder, but not this much. A gain of +28 per day simply by using the winder for seven days seems odd.

Could it be that 750 was too many, or to few TPD's? I am letting the watch wind down in hopes that it will go back to its regulated +4, but at this point I am skeptical about putting any other of my "better" watches in the winder. Any thoughts?
 

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Might run faster, might run slower, or not difference at all. Mechanical watches often run differently at different positions/angles. Sitting at the same position on a winder, it doesn't really mimic the way it's actually worn on the wrist. Not a big deal. If there's a significant difference, there's a possibility the watch was somehow magnetized, an easy fix and also not a big deal.
 

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I've been running all kinds watches on winders for years and in my experience if it runs fast or slow on the winder, it will run fast or slow on the wrist by a very similar amount... The only thing the winder does in ensure there is a relatively constant tension on the mainspring... :rolleyes:
 

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C huckw is correct.
Ill expand some on it.
Timing has ALOT to do with a watch's condition. If it is new, or has been serviced lately, it will run easier with less issues.
A watch that has not been serviced, or is over 4 years since last service could have issues with sticky greases and oils. A mainspring that is very sticky can have isochronism issues caused by excess tension in the mainspring as it is wound, especially when its in a winder. In other words, when the watch is winding with a sticky mainspring, it many cause the watch to run faster until the tension is equalized. Normally, its not an issue because modern automatics have slip mainsprings, but if the grease they slip on is sticky or dry, it causes tension issues.
Position IS a big determiner of timing. Test the watch on your wrist to make SURE the variation of timing is position.
ALL watches will time different in different positions. Its the mean average of all positions it experiences in a day that determines overall timing.
And yes magnetism can cause a watch to gain time excessively {2-3minutes a day on average} . But it sounds like your watch has more position issues rather than magnetism.
Rod
 
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