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Discussion Starter #1
Having last worn a mechanical watch at school, many years ago, I recall its accuracy being around 30 seconds or so per day. It was a "Seiko 5", so a reasonable quality automatic.

I was expecting a lot better from the Cosmograph Daytona, particularly with Rolex's claims of better than COSC accuracy & consistency, and also because of the generally accepted view that the 4130 movement is one of the ten best movements ever made.

However, having tested the watch for some time now, I have been completely astonished by its accuracy and consistency. After the initial days of getting used to it, I started to test it properly using an Atomic clock linked app for iPhone.

Over the last 7 days I have found that daily variation is in the range from minus 0.4 seconds to plus 1.1 seconds. The aggregate variation over the 7 days has been just plus 0.4 seconds!


Frankly astonishing! Albeit not as accurate as my quartz Rado of course (0.0 seconds variance over the last month).
 

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I think you'll get similar results from the Bulova Precisionist watches ... they are advertised at accuracy up to 10 seconds a year ... I own 2 ... One was 4 secs slow and the other was 2 secs slow after 1 year.

I do not own stock in Bulova or sell there products. I am amazed with this kind of accuracy ... note that I alternated each month and wore one of the Precisionists ~15 days each month.

I have found that my 2 auto wind automatics Swiss with ETA 7750 's are running about 15 secs slow each year. Most of the time I have them on a watch winder... I wear them 1 or 2 days a month. Those are both Wenger products that are no longer made. They were purchased in 1993 and 1997. I have the Field and the Pilot models. I was advised by a watch maker that they are both just below the chronometer grade movements from ETA.

I had the 1993 purchase serviced twice and the 1997 serviced once. It is due for servicing in a couple of years. As long as companies like Revue Thommen use this level ETA 7750 movements I am good to go. Any parts that are needed are readily available since the movement is actually 3 modules working together and relatively easily replaced saving huge labor charges for cleaning and maintenance.

The situation is much different with the discontinued top of the line Wenger automatic with the addition of the moonphase complication. The ETA 7751 movement would most likely need to be sent to Europe for repair. I guess I am fortunate to have not purchased the top of the line, though I came close on a few occasions. Luckily my practical side ruled the days when my impulsive side almost went $3499 since it is beautiful piece, with a 18 caret gold and stainless band or an Alligator distinctive band for $3199.

I know it's like a fish story except a good friend who spent $3499 now has an estimate from his watch maker in NY for Rolex maintenance prices...
 

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I had three Citizen Signature automatics with the Miyota 9010 and 9012 movements in them, all got outstanding accuracy, one was actually getting +2 a week.

My Sinn U1 with a Sellita SW200 is getting -1 second a day. I would prefer a watch that runs fast rather then slow though, easier to adjust.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Well, it's been 3 weeks now since I set the Daytona (4130), and it is currently 0.2 seconds off Atomic time.

I have found though (during testing in December) that this level of accuracy and consistency requires that I place the watch crown down overnight, which is no hardship.

Still amazed that a mechanical watch can achieve this.
 

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Well, it's been 3 weeks now since I set the Daytona (4130), and it is currently 0.2 seconds off Atomic time.

I have found though (during testing in December) that this level of accuracy and consistency requires that I place the watch crown down overnight, which is no hardship.

Still amazed that a mechanical watch can achieve this.
Sounds like you have a lifetime keeper with this watch!
 

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Keep in mind that the accuracy of a mechanical movement depends not only on design but also the condition of the movement as well as how it was regulated at the factory and finally how it's used... Temperature, on the wrist, on the winder, how many hours worn etc... Some of my cheapest autos keep better time than my most expensive "COSC" or otherwise... :rolleyes:
 

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Keep in mind that the accuracy of a mechanical movement depends not only on design but also the condition of the movement as well as how it was regulated at the factory and finally how it's used... Temperature, on the wrist, on the winder, how many hours worn etc... Some of my cheapest autos keep better time than my most expensive "COSC" or otherwise... :rolleyes:
I will have to agree with that.Keep in mind that in top horology is not the accuracy that counts but the craftmaship and above all the so called complications included in a watch. Most mechanical watches id properly tuned preform very well. On the other hand some very accurate and expensive movements are very fragile and manufacturers avoid using them in sport or diving watches. So the buy ebauche kits from others and custom tune them.
Sometimes also cost comes into mind.You will be surprised to see movement from the 60's built entirely by hand to a number of 500-1000 per year has a preformance greater them a modern watch regrdless of price that is mass produced by the thousands .

After all when you by a mechanical watch accuracy is relative according to the swiss observatory.
The sad part for watch fanatics, is that a $15 quartz movement comes close to atomic clock ratings if not exactly the same!!
 

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I was, for a long time, almost obsessed by accuracy in general, and accuracy in mechanical movements in particular. At one time I had a professional (used to feed a time signal to servers) DCF receiver with an external antenna. You could even dial-in an offset for the distance to the nearest DCF transmitter.

At that time I owned a Sub Date with the infamous 'Superlative Chronometer Officially Certified' on the dial. I still wonder what superlative stands for in this context. There is an official chronometer standard for mechanical movements and the movement either falls within the specs (passed) ot not (failed). To be 'superlative' the deviation must be well, well within these specs. Top of the heap, always.

But as mentioned before, any reasonable made quartz movement blows that COSC spec mechanical movement out of the water. (There's a separate chronometer standard for quartz watches as well BTW).

I don't care. I'm from that romantic school of thought that those mechanical movements are made by grey haired watchmakers with an eye-glass and bent over a work bench, working for weeks on a single movement.

I take all the downsides of mechanical movements for granted, in fact, I don't care. I know of no appointment that expects an accuracy of 15 seconds from me. I'm never late because I make sure I'm on time.

As I see it now, the mechanical movement is as popular as ever. Maybe just because of the intrinsic defects. The perfection can be found on another level. Emotion and connection instead of dry figures.
 

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Until the last 5which are all autos, my collection of 26 or so was all Quartz, with 6 being Atomic and another 2 Precisionists.

I buy because I like the watch not the movement, but must admit I find myself swaying to the autos at the moment. They all have exhibition backs as well. Some of the autos are much lower in price than The rest, but the accuracy of all is fine on the wrist, with some interesting variances in the display case.
 

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When it comes down to it, one expects accuracy from a Quartz watch but when a mechanical watch performs better than expected it's more satisfying...:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When it comes down to it, one expects accuracy from a Quartz watch but when a mechanical watch performs better than expected it's more satisfying...:rolleyes:
My point exactly.

btw it is still running to an accuracy level that I cannot believe. Using an Atomic clock linked iPhone App to verify btw.
 

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Remarkable Jas ! :smile-thumb: Makes you even appreciate the brand, and watch that much more really. So neat to hear. Keep us updated !
 
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