Watch Freeks banner

1 - 20 of 42 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Been looking to get one for my wife from this brand dealer as they have one in Durham,

https://pedegoelectricbikes.com/

I was just wondering how you liked it and any pluses or minuses you may have encountered. She already took a test drive in one and liked it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,209 Posts
I don't have one (yet). But in my country they are very popular amongst seniors. So much so that more electric bikes are sold now than conventional ones. From what I have read in the press:


  • Takes the 'sting' out of bike riding when it comes to going up hill or against head wind. They can get to speeds upwards of 40 kph. so new legislation is in the works to deal with this. We have many, many bicycle lanes but the difference in speed and the 'stealthy' way of how the bikes move makes them dangerous to other cyclists.
  • The less expensive bikes (usually made in China) have batteries with less capacity so they run down more quickly.
  • The bikes are still a tad on the expensive side. 3,000 Euro seems to become common but I think that's a hell of a lot of money.
  • Insurance over here is WAY more expensive. The riders cause more accidents and the bikes are very popular with thieves.
  • Don't underestimate the power and speed. It's not like a regular bicycle.
  • Longer trips become easy but mind the battery! If you run out of power in the middle of a forest you're done. The bikes are heavy and pedalling them without the electric assistance will become quite the challenge.
  • The mid-motor design (Shimano, Sachs) seems to be the best.
Will I buy one? Probably not, currently I'm looking for a single speed bike with a steel frame but fully adapted to city life. (Small rack on the front for groceries).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,581 Posts
Depending on what you will be getting, ie hub drive or geared mid drive, there are pros and cons for each of those wrt efficiency which may be worth exploring, eg. direct drive hub motors have reported compromised efficiency up hills etc and eat more battery in comparison with mid drive motors etc.

Either way, they look like lots of fun - good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
863 Posts
Looks like fun but I'm still doing it the traditional way with my 21-speed mountain bike. In the summer or whenever all the snow is gone, that's how I go to work. Albeit my work is only 1.4 miles away I still get a little exercise out of it. Maybe by the time I need one of those electric bikes the prices will be much more affordable and the battery life even longer/better. Have fun with it.

Take an action pic and share it with us when you get a chance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the input. the wife really wants to drive it to and from work which is only about 4 miles maybe but there are hills and the Raleigh summers would make her sweat and then use it for fun rides on the weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,209 Posts
My sister has one. She drives it everywhere. No insurance, no nothing. Man Frans, Europe must be a *****.
What if it gets stolen? In my country WA insurance (liability insurance) is mandatory for vehicles like these. But that's not the expensive part, the part to cover theft is. I know many Americans balk at anything mandatory but if you hit someone and he or she gets disabled for life you will go bankrupt without insurance. And those bikes can go mighty fast.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
^^^ Nice springy Brooks Frans, and that beefy rack - I cannot figure out - it attaches to your handlebars?

Since we're posting some non-electric bikes :D I will date myself with my unwillingness to embrace new tech and materials!

Commuter bike (when Trek still hand built bikes in the '80s) :

https://flic.kr/p/ND1B5s https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/

Around the neighborhood and just for some exercise, Seattle is extremely hilly and this thing makes me work (an oddly comfy old Panasonic):

https://flic.kr/p/29oeJ12 https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,209 Posts
I don't have an electric bicycle but have this 1950's Gazelle which still gives a nice ride. Frans, you will know this famous old manufacturer well.

I certainly do! Had to look up the specifics and what astounded me is that the brand is now owned by Pon, the Dutch VW importer. I'm glad it's back in Dutch hands. The first time we were in Indonesia I noticed that Gazelle bicycles were sold at a big store (Bric-à-brac) on Jalan Malioboro in Jogja. They were mainly pre-WWII models that were exported to Indonesia in the 30s. They were between one and three million Rupiah (US$ 66 to 198). No means to transport one back home I didn't buy one but restored exemplars from that era fetch quite a buck now over here. Vintage biking is becoming all the rage with Saturday morning bike rides.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
I don't have an electric bicycle but have this 1950's Gazelle which still gives a nice ride. Frans, you will know this famous old manufacturer well.


Wow, that's in great shape for its age, Steve. Even us Americans (if you were a kid during the mid-'70s during the 10-speed boom here) know Gazelle. They made some beautiful racers too, but for everyday useful riding, that geometry your bike has provides a more upright and relaxed position.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,209 Posts
Wow, that's in great shape for its age, Steve. Even us Americans (if you were a kid during the mid-'70s during the 10-speed boom here) know Gazelle. They made some beautiful racers too, but for everyday useful riding, that geometry your bike has provides a more upright and relaxed position.

Yes, Champion Mondial frames. Again, I knew that they existed but did not know they had a specialized workshop up to the mid Eighties, employing a staff of 30 to hand-build these frames. During the 'fixie' craze they were sold for scrap and mutilated to turn bikes into fixies :mad:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,123 Posts
Yes, Champion Mondial frames. Again, I knew that they existed but did not know they had a specialized workshop up to the mid Eighties, employing a staff of 30 to hand-build these frames. During the 'fixie' craze they were sold for scrap and mutilated to turn bikes into fixies :mad:
OMFG... fixies. Don’t make me post in the grumpy old man thread.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,581 Posts
Wow, that's in great shape for its age, Steve. Even us Americans (if you were a kid during the mid-'70s during the 10-speed boom here) know Gazelle. They made some beautiful racers too, but for everyday useful riding, that geometry your bike has provides a more upright and relaxed position.
Cheers Eric. I haven't owned it since the 50's but it does have some character. Picked up some interesting 'patina" (read surface rust) along its journey.

OMFG... fixies. Don’t make me post in the grumpy old man thread.
Post away if you must.
It's being said that fixed gear bikes "have become part of urban culture, they're great for fitness and most importantly they're trendy, so you'll look cool on one". Reason enough?
 
1 - 20 of 42 Posts
Top