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I've read various opinions about Lume and it's longevity after being exposed to light. On thing that kept sticking in my mind was the comment(s) that the longer you exposed the lume to light the longer it would last. I never completely bought into this because there would be many nights where I would throw my wrist under the bedside lamp for a few minutes and it seemed to last as long as if I had placed the watch on the table with a light on it for up to 20 minutes.
The other night I decided to try an experiment; I used two watches that have very similar lume characteristics (Invicta's). I placed the first one under my wife's bedside lamp for 30 minutes and the other (on my wrist) under my lamp (same lamps) for 2 minutes.
I woke 3 hours later (bathroom break) and checked both watches, they both appeared to be giving off the same amount of lume. I stirred 2 hours later but had the wherewithal to check again....once again very similar findings. When I finally woke in the morning I took both watches into the bathroom and shut off the light, no difference. Last night I conducted the same test with two watches with Superluminova.....same results.

Based on my highly technical experiment, I conclude that there is a saturation point with Lume and that it does not take hours or days to get there...more like 3 to 5 minutes.

If anyone has any information to support or contradict my findings please let me know. Thanks for listening (and yes, I need to get a life):%:%:%

CJ
 

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Hi CJ, you may be right. I usually place my timepiece under a lamp for a while before wearing it, if I know it might be dark when wearing the watch. I never thought about trying to give it light for just a couple moments as you did and seeing what happens. In the yellow Invicta instruction manual on page one, it relates "Trinite requires 4-5 hours of exposure to light for it to glow brightly in the dark. It will continue to perform with regular exposure to light" I have not yet became a fan of Invicta's lume. Thanks CJ for your lume test. ....Bob
 

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NO sweat Bob!
Funny you should mention the Invicta instructions; I accidentally left a watch (Reserve pro Diver) under the lamp for several hours (I'm guessing 5 or so) and again it did not appear to make any difference compared to 5 minutes......???




Bob wrote:
Hi CJ, you may be right. I usually place my timepiece under a lamp for a while before wearing it, if I know it might be dark when wearing the watch. I never thought about trying to give it light for just a couple moments as you did and seeing what happens. In the yellow Invicta instruction manual on page one, it relates "Trinite requires 4-5 hours of exposure to light for it to glow brightly in the dark. It will continue to perform with regular exposure to light" I have not yet became a fan of Invicta's lume. Thanks CJ for your lume test. ....Bob
 

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It does sound like some Plumbing problems, however if CJ is anything like Rip he drinks a boat load of water, and I frequently wake up during the night. When I dont drink a lot of water during the day I wont.

Now back onto the topic, I agree it does not take a lot of time to charge the lume. I use the tanning bed we have here in the house to charge the lume, and after 5 minutes it is as charged as it is going to get. What I find interesting more then anything is the alleged greatness of Super luminova over Tritnite. The Android, SWI and Renato all have Super Luminova, and they do not glow or outlast the Tritnite that are on my Russian Divers!
 

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Cool experiment, CJ. Thanks for taking the time to write about it.

My only comparative experience is when I bought an LED flashlight which was recommended by another collector/photographer.

I would use incandescent light (normal house bulb) to charge my lume and it would suffice (as long as you were willing to wait).

I now use my LED flashlight, and the lume is fully charge in a matter of a minute or so. The LED-charged lume lasts longer than the incandescent-charged lume.



 

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I've had ths same results when I have tried similar experiments. My Orange Monster has always lasted longer then any other watch in my collection. The Luminox with the gas bulbs well you know that thing shines day and night and never stops. Very cool. Thanks CJ
 

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YouZe guyZ are killin' me ...
...
__________________________________________

... FWIW (about 2¢), the trick is NOT in the intensity (per se) OR the duration ...​
... it's in the Lambda - λ - ; i.e., the WAVELENGTH of the 'irradiating light source' !
[align=center]


(ABOVE Image Courtesy http://www.pages.drexel.edu/~brooksdr/DRB_web_page/uv-a/UVA.htm )[/align]__________________________________________

Even MORE specifically, since wavelength is (basically) inversely proportional to frequency, ...
... as the frequency goes UP, wavelength DECREASES!​
... and, again, IMHO, outside of some 'exotic (x/micro-wave) irradiating sources!' ...​
... the narrow-bandwidth (concentrated/focused λ) beam from a small BLACK-light flashlight ...​
... is the absolute BEST source to 'excite' phosphors up to their 'most-radiant' state! ...​
... and I use a re-chargeable UV-A unit w/LED's that, again, 'concentrate' the energy!
[align=center]
[/align]___________________________________________

I just place it right over the dial - for ONLY a few seconds - each night ...
... to keep whatever watch I'm wearin' glowin' till the sun comes up - and then some!
... Of course, the quality of the watch phosphors are, ultimately, the most important factor in all of this! ...
... and, from my experience so far, you simply cannot 'outshine' Super-Luminova®!
__________________________________________

[align=center]NB: Since MOST of the energy is 'focused' between 365~375 nanometres ...

... NEVER stare directly at a U-V light !!! ...

:madd

... even the 'low-energy' beam emitted by a flashlight!
[/align]

 

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Watch_Crazy wrote:
YouZe guyZ are killin' me ...
...
__________________________________________

... FWIW (about 2¢), the trick is NOT in the intensity OR the duration ...​

... it's in the Lambda - λ - ; i.e., the WAVELENGTH of the 'irradiating light source' !
[align=center]


(ABOVE Image Courtesy http://www.pages.drexel.edu/~brooksdr/DRB_web_page/uv-a/UVA.htm )[/align]__________________________________________

Even MORE specifically, since wavelength is inversely proportional to frequency, ...
... as the frequency goes UP, wavelength DECREASES!​

... and, again, IMHO, outside of some 'exotic (x/micro-wave) irradiating sources!' ...​


... the BEST light to 'excite' phosphor(s) is a small, portable, BLACKLIGHT FLASHLIGHT! ...​



... and I use a re-chargeable UV-A (low-energy) unit w/LED's that 'focus' the energy!
___________________________________________

I just place it right over the dial - for just a few seconds - each night ...
... to keep whatever watch I'm wearin' glowin' till the sun come up - and then some!
__________________________________________


[align=center]NB: Since MOST of the energy is 'focused' between 365~375 nanometres ...

... NEVER stare directly at a U-V light !!! ...

:madd

... even the 'low-energy' beam emitted by a flashlight!
[/align]

It's all in the Lambda. That's some good info right there (worth more than .02 to me).

Ya learn somethin' new every day, and this isn't a bad start for me at 0100 on a Sunday!
 
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