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RXP 02-09-2013 08:56 PM

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I have this G-Shock but I don't have a manual for it and I have no idea how to set the tides anybody know where I can find idiot proof instructions on how to do this?

http://i915.photobucket.com/albums/a...ico/gshock.jpg

andrema 02-09-2013 09:14 PM

imported post
 
Casio has online user guides. I believe a link to it has been posted here at WF previously. Do a search on the Casio forum and it should show up.

nine 02-09-2013 09:16 PM

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Try this:

http://world.casio.com/wat/download/en/manual/

andrema 02-09-2013 09:18 PM

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http://support.casio.com/manuallist.php?rgn=1&cid=002

tempusfugit 03-10-2014 02:44 AM

I hope this is the right place for my questions. Let me know if I should start a new thread for this.

I have a used G-Shock in need of repair. From what I can tell, it needs a new CTL 1616 rechargeable power cell, which I found online in L.A. for ten bucks. Then there are videos online with step-by-step instructions on how to change out the 'capacitor'.

I have one question about the step that says you have to press the - and the + circles on the watch movement after replacing the power cell to reset the watch, before you close it up. Does anyone here know what that 'reset' is all about, and how can I be sure that I pressed the correct spots on the movement back?

Then, I have questions about CLEANING the many joints and crevices on the watch surface. This used watch was pretty grimy and had lots of stuck-on accumulated dirt, especially in those tiny corners. Is there any way to REMOVE all the rubber/plastic lapping parts that are on the outside of these G-Shocks, so it's easier to clean out the spaces behind them? Is there a chemical solution that is a preferred cleaner for these parts after they're removed? I'm a little reluctant to use ammonia or degreaser. As far as I can tell, finding replacement parts may be impossible, since there are so many different models, colors and sizes of G-Shocks.

I was thinking that maybe they're 'disposable' and everyone just 'gets a new one' -- but now I see that $99 is about the cheapest, and $150 is kind of average, but there are a lot of G-Shocks in the $300-and-up range, like over $800. That's not "disposable" in my book!

Anyone paying $800 for a watch should expect to find every replacement part possible after 100% disassembly.

And what about the glass or lens? Are any of these sapphire or quasi-sapphire?

tempusfugit 03-10-2014 03:06 AM

Am I seeing this correctly? It appears that the tiny circle to the left of "SAT" is the solar cell area, or is it the area around "CASIO" or left and right of the time that's solar cells?



Quote:

Originally Posted by RXP (Post 405191)
I have this G-Shock but I don't have a manual for it and I have no idea how to set the tides anybody know where I can find idiot proof instructions on how to do this?

http://i915.photobucket.com/albums/a...ico/gshock.jpg


One thing I've noticed reading the User Manuals for G-Shocks is that when the battery runs down and is close to needing emergency recharge by solar cell exposure to light, there is an indicator that warns of this condition, and when that indicator is flashing, you cannot access certain functions until after you recharge the capacitor. The time will display okay, but you won't be able to CHANGE the time or date or "tides" for example.

So before you enter any data, such as "tides", you have to be sure your capacitor is fully charged, or at least mostly charged. I imagine you could be in the middle of a sequence of data entry and then if the battery slides into the lower charge state in the middle of your data entry, you could lose all the data that was incompletely entered, for example.

There is another problem, that arises from a watch that has been setting around for a few years, as yours might have been. The capacitor might be too old and in need of replacement. You will find out if that is the case by exposing it to bright light for two hours and see if it charged up COMPLETELY. If not, it might be the capacitor is getting old. You can further check by leaving the watch exposed for a day to bright light, either direct sunlight or a reading lamp at a reasonable distance. If it's a high intensity lamp, don't put that two inches away from the watch as it could be TOO MUCH light for the watch, and maybe that's not so good. Keep a halogen lamp at about 10" or more away, I'd say. In the various instruction videos they don't explain this but they do show a FLUORESCENT LAMP being used for the charging light source. Those are not as bright as high-intensity lamps.

So, after 8 or more hours of bright light, if the charge indicator is not COMPLETELY displayed, showing MAXIMUM charge or 100%, then you have a capacitor that cannot be fully charged. In that case, you could go ahead and use the watch at less than maximum capacity, meaning that you need to expose it perhaps weekly or even daily to light lest the capacitor runs out of power, or, if you want to get rid of these problems, then just replace the capacitor with a new one, and fully charged it can run in the dark for 60 or more days, no problem. And fully charged you can have plenty of time to enter "tides" data, or phone numbers or appointments or golf scores or passwords for online banking or whatever it is you're going to key in.

When you replace the capacitor you lose all your stored data. Also, a weak capacitor might run out of power before you get the watch out of the drawer again, and according to the User Manuals, you will suffer corruption or complete LOSS of all stored data when the power fails.

So that's another reason to replace the capacitor FIRST before you key in data in a watch that's been in a dark drawer for 6 years, like perhaps all watches you buy on E-bay! HAHAHAHA

stockae92 03-11-2014 09:07 PM

For the All Clear (AC) done after replacing battery or rechargeable cell, you should need to short the 2 contacts, the next thing you should see on the LCD is 12:00:00 and 1/1 and the second should be counting like normal. There's no beep or any other indication that AC happened. It just did. :)

You can usually locate the AC contact on the metal plate on the back of the movement, then just short it with the +ve of the battery and it should do it.

I think its just to clear out all the registers in the circuit and make sure that the numbers and features are showing correctly. Cause who knows how the circuit will perform when there is insufficient volt to power it but still have some electrons flowing.

As for cleaning, I just clean mine from time to time with old tooth brush, warm water and mild soap.

Most of the upper price range G-Shocks are solar so you won't have to worry about changing battery and opening up the case back for a long long time. And really, at that price, you should get a beater for the beater :p

There are a few G-Shocks with sapphire crystal, most current MRG has sapphire crystal, and I think some GWA1100 has it as well.

Quote:

Originally Posted by tempusfugit (Post 973345)
I hope this is the right place for my questions. Let me know if I should start a new thread for this.

I have a used G-Shock in need of repair. From what I can tell, it needs a new CTL 1616 rechargeable power cell, which I found online in L.A. for ten bucks. Then there are videos online with step-by-step instructions on how to change out the 'capacitor'.

I have one question about the step that says you have to press the - and the + circles on the watch movement after replacing the power cell to reset the watch, before you close it up. Does anyone here know what that 'reset' is all about, and how can I be sure that I pressed the correct spots on the movement back?

Then, I have questions about CLEANING the many joints and crevices on the watch surface. This used watch was pretty grimy and had lots of stuck-on accumulated dirt, especially in those tiny corners. Is there any way to REMOVE all the rubber/plastic lapping parts that are on the outside of these G-Shocks, so it's easier to clean out the spaces behind them? Is there a chemical solution that is a preferred cleaner for these parts after they're removed? I'm a little reluctant to use ammonia or degreaser. As far as I can tell, finding replacement parts may be impossible, since there are so many different models, colors and sizes of G-Shocks.

I was thinking that maybe they're 'disposable' and everyone just 'gets a new one' -- but now I see that $99 is about the cheapest, and $150 is kind of average, but there are a lot of G-Shocks in the $300-and-up range, like over $800. That's not "disposable" in my book!

Anyone paying $800 for a watch should expect to find every replacement part possible after 100% disassembly.

And what about the glass or lens? Are any of these sapphire or quasi-sapphire?



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